Skeena River, salmon sign. (Jackie Lieuwen / Black Press)

Skeena First Nations push for full closure of recreational fishery

Eight First Nations on the Skeena River watershed say DFO’s chinook restrictions isn’t enough

A group of eight First Nations are pushing for a full closure of all recreational fisheries in the Skeena River Watershed, both freshwater and marine.

The group, part of the Skeena Nations Fisheries Fish Forum Protocol, said they oppose the recent actions by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) and the B.C government to allow some recreational fishing.

DFO temporarily closed recreational fishing May 8, and then on May 30 announced that there would be a 25-30 per cent reduction in exploitation rates for chinook this year due to conservation concerns. Recreational anglers are allowed to catch one chinook per day in marine waters near Prince Rupert, and Kitimat to Haida Gwaii.

READ MORE: Sweeping salmon closures for recreational fishing

READ MORE: DFO implements chinook restrictions

But the Skeena Nations Fish Forum released a press release today saying that’s not enough.

The Skeena First Nations Technical Committee requested that DFO close all freshwater and marine fisheries impacting Skeena Chinook, with no catch and release option, but DFO did not follow that recommendation, it says in the press release.

“We oppose the actions of DFO allowing the recreational fishery to harvest Chinook in this salmon crisis, and BC issuing guide outfitter permits and individual licenses to allow the recreational steelhead catch and release fishery to remain open,” said Bruce Watkinson, co-chair of the Skeena Nations Fish Secretariat.

“If Canada and B.C. are serious about their commitments to Indigenous peoples, then the Skeena watershed and marine waters should be closed to all recreational salmon fishing for the 2018 season.”

The release goes on to state that the DFO actions appease the recreational fishery but do not live up to its obligation to protect the Skeena fishery and the interests of First Nations.

“The Skeena Nations support conservation, however our Constitutional Aboriginal rights must be recognized and respected – to ensure this, we will engage in a collaborative process and dialogue with DFO and B.C.,” it said.

READ MORE: Salmon closures a devastating blow to businesses

First Nations’ signatories include leaders from Gitga’at, Gitxaala, Gitxsan Hereditary Chiefs, Kitselas, Kitsumkalum, Lake Babine, Metlakatla, and the Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chiefs.


 


jackie@terracestandard.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Puff, puff, pass: Cannabis is officially legal across Canada

B.C. has only one bricks-and-mortar marijuana store

Terrace and Thornhill school board trustee candidates: why they’re running

There are two open positions in Terrace, one in Thornhill

Four marijuana stores looking at Terrace

The potential purveyors working through application process

Letter on FPTP calls for a rebuttal

Dear Editor, Mr. Martin’s letter (Unease over referendum; Oct/11/18) calls for a… Continue reading

Fix the downtown: council candidates hear from voters

Related issues of addictions, housing feature prominently at All Candidates Forum

VIDEO: How to roll a joint

The cannabis connoisseur shares his secrets to rolling the perfect joint

Scope of Hurricane Michael’s fury becomes clearer in Florida Panhandle

Nearly 137,000 Florida customers remain without power from the Gulf of Mexico to the Georgia border

Streamlined pardon process for pot possession convictions in Canada

Feds say legalization is first step towards objectives of getting pot out of the hands of kids and eliminating black market

Boeser tallies in OT as Canucks beat Penguins 3-2

Vancouver wins without star rookie Pettersson

Mayor of Kamloops says ‘history has been made’ with vote on B.C.’s lone pot shop

The store to be run by the province in B.C.’s Interior is opening Wednesday as pot sales become legal across Canada

New bus route to ‘replace’ Greyhound along Trans-Canada Highway

Rider Express Transportation says they will soon begin a bus service from Winnipeg to Vancouver

U.S. pot firm urges Trump to deny Canadian producers ‘competitive advantage’

The challenge for U.S. firms lies in the fact that while recreational cannabis is legal in nine states and medicinal pot in 22 others, it remains illegal under federal law

Government says imprisoned Canadian terror suspects must face consequences

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale showed little sympathy Tuesday for such individuals who now want to return to Canada

How rules for inmate segregation in Canada will change under Bill C-83

Federal government proposing changes to rules around inmates in federal correctional institutions

Most Read