RCMP must bury three sex mannequins found in Manning Park

Police tasked with ensuring the mannequins were completely disposed of

Princeton RCMP recently learned how complicated it can be to dispose of a body.

Officers at the detachment were tasked with disposing of three sex mannequins, discovered earlier this year in a wooded area near Manning Park.

READ MORE: False report of dead body leads police to sex dolls at Manning Park

According to Sgt. Rob Hughes, landfill staff were consulted about the best way to dump the dolls without causing potential panic later on.

The dolls are made of silicone, which does not decompose, so if they ever re-surfaced in the landfill, “anyone seeing them would think it was a body.”

One mostly complete mannequin – the legs were chopped off at the knees – was quite human-like, said Hughes.

Those very features were what that led to investigators to the dolls in the first place, after someone called on July 10 to report a body in a bush near Highway 3.

A doll was covered by a tarp, and the responding officer was prepared to find human remains when he approached.

Said Cpl. Chad Parsons: “This is the very first found sex mannequin that I have seen.”

A search of the area revealed two more partial mannequins.

The items cannot be easily dissassembled because they have steel skeletons.

They were stored at the Princeton detachment for 90 days.

“The RCMP are not surprised nobody claimed them due to their private nature,” said Hughes.

He added the most lifelike mannequin likely cost several thousand dollars.

To report a typo, email:
publisher@similkameenspotlight.com
.



andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Schools ramp up contact efforts with students

Efforts of school district employees called “extraordinary”

North District RCMP see massive spike in domestic calls

Connection to COVID-19 pandemic likely for reduced call volume, increased severity

Northwest mines lengthen crew rotations in response to COVID-19

Northern Health confident precautions sufficient enough to keep work camps open

Coastal GasLink gives $100K to United Way efforts in Northern B.C.

Organization’s COVID-19 Relief Fund benefits seniors in isolation, among others

COVID-19: Trudeau says 30K ventilators on the way; 3.6M Canadians claim benefits

Canada has seen more than 17,000 cases and at least 345 deaths due to COVID-19

COMMENTARY: Knowing where COVID-19 cases are does not protect you

Dr. Bonnie Henry explains why B.C. withholds community names

As Canadians return home amid pandemic, border crossings dip to just 5% of usual traffic

Non-commercial land crossing dipped by 95%, air travel dropped by 96 per cent, according to the CBSA

B.C. wide burning restrictions come into effect April 16

‘Larger open burns pose an unnecessary risk and could detract from wildfire detection’

B.C. secures motel, hotel rooms for COVID-19 shelter space

Community centres, rooms reserved for pandemic self-isolation

Look at hospitalizations, not recovery stats for COVID-19, B.C. professor says

Cases in hospital are a definitive count of people who have the novel coronavirus

B.C. First Nations want to launch fight of Trans Mountain pipeline approval

Last month, the Supreme Court of Canada decided not to hear five challenges about the pipeline

N95 masks on the way for Canada after 3M reaches deal with White House

The Trump White House had ordered 3M to stop shipping masks to Canada

Most Read