B.C. to implement longer prohibitions for dangerous drivers

Drivers caught street racing or stunt driving will soon see driving prohibitions extended up to 36 months

Tougher penalties are coming soon to dangerous drivers in British Columbia.

Beginning next month, those drivers caught street racing or stunt driving will face longer prohibitions that will be looked at on a case-by-case basis. RoadSafetyBC will set the length of each prohibition based on details provided by police, as well as the driver’s record.

“The drivers posing the greatest risk to people’s lives are often caught repeatedly, and that tells us they aren’t taking the consequences seriously,” said Minister of Public Safety and Solicitor General Mike Farnworth. “We’re going to be scrutinizing their driving more closely and making sure the penalty fits. Racers who won’t take their cars to the track can expect to walk or use public transit.”

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These prohibitions will also extend to a wider range of offences, including excessive speeding, driving without due care and attention and other high-risk behaviours that present an immediate risk to public safety.

Most of the new prohibitions are expected to range between three and 36 months, significantly longer than the existing 15-day penalties currently in place for street racing and stunt driving. Drivers will be able to ask to have their case reviewed through an adjudication process already in use when drivers appeal prohibitions under the Driver Improvement Program.

In addition to the stiffer prohibitions, police will still have the ability to immediately impound vehicles for at least seven days if drivers are caught racing or stunting.



ragnar.haagen@bpdigital.ca

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