First look at the new vision for downtown Terrace

A draft of the plan will be revised with community input before heading to council

The City of Terrace unveiled the preliminary concept of a new downtown vision plan last week. About 20 members of the public attended a presentation at the Days Inn on June 21, contributing their ideas to a final round of revisions.

“Once it’s incorporated into our official community plan then it’s a document that is used all the time,” said city planner Tara Irwin. “It’s like a working document, it’s not just a plan that sits on the shelf.”

The plan will include a set of downtown guidelines, which lay out a set of rules for developers looking to build in Terrace. The plan’s role is to give some context as to why those guidelines are important, aligning potential investments into the city’s overall vision of making the downtown the symbolic heart of the city.

“It paints the bigger picture why it’s a good idea to play by the rules,” said Edward Porter, a consultant with Modus Planning Design and Engagement.

Opinions and ideas on what Terrace’s downtown should look like have been gathered from the community since January, through online platforms like Wayblaze and organized events.

The draft started to come together in March after a two-day workshop was held with city staff, council and key stakeholders. Ideas drawn up from those discussions were then distilled into a roadmap, framed by five objectives used to provide context to a series of catalyst projects targeting specific sites in the downtown.

These objectives, referred to as the ‘Five Fundamentals’ in the plan, include strategies to define smaller precincts within the downtown, encourage more residential housing projects, incorporate a pedestrian first approach, add more green spaces and boost the arts and culture scene in the city.

“We’re saying these [fundamentals] need to be a part of future developments for downtown Terrace,” said Porter during the presentation.

The creation of eight smaller precincts, one of the biggest changes proposed, will be used to emphasize areas of the downtown that have their own unique identities, while still recognizing them as parts of a whole. According to the plan, precincts can help foster economic growth and development by clustering similar businesses together in one specific area.

The Five Fundamentals will then be used as a reference point for ten targeted projects, or the ‘Ten Big Moves’, proposed within the plan for the downtown’s two-block core and surrounding areas. Projects include the development of a downtown “living room” for pedestrians to gather along the 4600 block of Lazelle Avenue, and a seasonal pop-up marketplace for entrepreneurs in the Skeena Mall parking lot.

Saša Loggin, chair of the board of directors for the Terrace Downtown Improvement Area Society (TDIA), said she really favoured the precincts idea.

“These little areas, they will be unique in themselves because they have different needs,” she said, adding that it encourages relationships between businesses and community-building activities like block parties.

Having places to gather and be social are important, Loggin said.

“I come from a European country so town squares are really the heart of most European cities, and that’s what’s missing in North America, so having places where people can come together and sort of find out what’s happening… places to sit and gather, with complete strangers, that’s really nice.”

Community feedback on the plan will be accepted up until the first two weeks in July through Wayblaze, according to the city, with hopes that a final draft can be presented to council for adoption by the end of the month.

Terrace Downtown Plan and Design Guidelines – DRAFT by Anonymous WUrl0YG on Scribd


 


brittany@terracestandard.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Thornhill’s future takes centre stage at June 2 public hearing

The current community plan was adopted in 1981

Class will look different at Coast Mountain College this September

The college is embracing a distributed learning model

City council considers easing food truck restriction

Food trucks limited to four hours public parking, may increase to six hours

Only four new COVID-19 cases, 228 active across B.C.

Health officials watching as activities ramp up

Facing changes together: your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

Feds looking at ways to reunite families amid COVID-19 border restrictions with U.S.

Some families with members of dual-citizenship have become separated due to the pandemic

Condition in kids with possible COVID-19 link being studied in Canada

This month, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued an alert to doctors about MIS-C

‘I knew what he wanted’: Kootenay man spends hours in tree as black bear patrols below

Francis Levasseur is no stranger to the outdoors, but a recent run-in with a bear caused quite a scare

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

COVID cancelled their wedding plans, so they married on a BC mountaintop

Ceremony was live streamed to friends and family around the world

Trudeau acknowledges racial unrest in U.S.; ‘We also have work to do in Canada’

‘Anti-black racism, racism, is real; it’s in the United States, but it’s also in Canada,’ Trudeau says

State of Local Emergency declared for Boundary as communities brace for river flooding

Warm weather and heavy rain could cause sections of Kettle River system to swell beyond 2018 levels

Most Read