One of the more thasn 50 cats surrendered from a single Victoria owner last week. Most of the animals have eye and upper respiratory infections, dehydrated, and are in need of serious dental work. (Photo courtesy of Victoria BC SPCA)

Fifty-plus cats surrendered to Victoria BC SPCA from single home

It will cost tens of thousands to rehabilitate the animals

The last of more than 50 cats are being brought in from a local home to the Victoria shelter of the BC SPCA, and it’s expected to cost tens of thousands of dollars to rehabilitate them.

The cats arrived in groups of 20 to 30 between Wednesday and Friday last week after an investigation led to their surrender by their owner. Most of them are in pretty sad shape, according to Annie Prittie Bell, branch manager in Victoria, but she is grateful they are out of their previous situation.

“They’re in really gross shape,” she said. “They’re coated in urine and feces, a lot of these guys, so we’ve been washing them and cleaning ears and cleaning faces, and shaving mats, and trying to clean bodies if the urine scald is tight to the skin.

“We’re probably looking at 30 that are going to need dental work. There is a lot of dental disease in these guys, and lots of dehydration, lots of upper-respiratory and eye infections.”

Dealing with the health issues of so many cats at once will cost thousands, Prittie Bell said.

Because most of the animals seized were so sick, 25 healthy cats that were being housed in the shelter were moved into foster homes and into shelters in Nanaimo and Cowichan. The latest batch of surrendered animals to come in have been given physical exams, cleaned, vaccinated, de-fleaed and de-wormed.

The situation has been difficult, Prittie Bell said, both emotionally and in terms of processing the massive influx of cats with some staff on holidays.

“I’ve had [my] moments,” she said, “I think the cat that started drinking and wouldn’t stop was probably the hardest from what I saw. It’s been pretty tough.”

But this isn’t the end of the line for these cats. They may be afraid, but there is hope they can recover and be placed in new homes.

“A lot of them are really workable. There’s one that’s a little bit more bitey and one that’s hissey, but they’re remarkably handleable as a crew,” Prittie Bell said, “considering there were so many and they wouldn’t have been getting one-on-one socialization.”

BC SPCA will release more information as the investigation unfolds.

Sunday’s fundraiser goal now higher

The Paws for a Cause fundraiser walk happening this Sunday (Sept. 10) originally had a goal of $50,000, but with the recent influx of sick cats, more money is urgently needed.

“This influx of cats has definitely put pressure on our shelter and we really appreciate any help the public can provide in helping with the costs for these animals,” said Prittie Bell. Donations can be made at spca.bc.ca/support or in person at the shelter at 3150 Napier Lane.

Paws for a Cause, benefiting the BC SPCA Victoria Branch and the Wild Animal Rehabilitation Centre, takes place at Clover Point off Dallas Road gets underway at 10 a.m. with the walk starting at 11:30. There will be entertainment and other activities, a barbecue and community vendor booths.

lauren.boothby@vicnews.com

 

Five of the more than 50 cats surrendered from a single Victoria home huddled together. Most of the cats have upper respiratory and eye infections, and need serious dental work. (Photo courtesy of Victoria BC SPCA)

Just Posted

Caledonia Kermode basketball team holds first-ever Men’s Health Night fundraiser

Approximately $250 was raised during the senior boys’ home opener game

Here are the top earners at Coast Mountains School District

Audited financial report released for 2018/2019 fiscal year

Skeena Voices | The wild path

Courtenay Crucil is a nature-based therapist and herbalist who helps people with the earth in mind

Northwest B.C. physician receives Medal of Good Citizenship Award

Dr. Peter Newbery was one of 18 people in B.C. to get provincial recognition

Terrace RCMP search for wanted man

The public is not believed to be at risk

VIDEO: Boys help rescue Cariboo bear cub

The cub, weighing just 24lbs, has been taken to wildlife sanctuary in Northwest B.C. for the winter

‘Things haven’t changed enough:’ Ecole Polytechnique anniversary prompts reflection

Fourteen women were fatally shot by a gunman at the Montreal school on Dec. 6, 1989

Bear raids freezer, gorges on Island family’s Christmas baking

Hungry bruin virtually ignored meat and fish, focused, instead, on the sweets

B.C. pharmaceutical company’s stocks double in value after successful lupus drug trial

More than 40 per cent of patients using voclosporin saw improvements in kidney function

Second warning on romaine lettuce from California region as another E. coli case reported

Two cases of E. coli have been reported in relation to the illness in the U.S.

Coastal GasLink receives first delivery of pipe sections

Company expects to begin welding and pipe laying in 2020

Residents in B.C. city could face 133% tax hike in ‘worst case’ lawsuit outcome: report

An average home could see a tax increase of $2,164 in one year

B.C. Transit finds 28 used fareboxes online, saves $300,000

‘Someone joked maybe we can buy used fareboxes on eBay,’ CEO says

Many of Canada’s working poor can’t afford lawyers, don’t qualify for legal aid

One lawyer says many people earn too much to qualify for legal aid, but not enough to really live on

Most Read