Canadian Air Forces CC-177 Globemaster may be seen in skies above Prince Rupert on training exercises be carried out across B.C., the RCAF advised, on July 6. The training missions will between July 7th to 10th. (Photo: supplied by Royal Canadian Air Force)

Canadian Air Forces CC-177 Globemaster may be seen in skies above Prince Rupert on training exercises be carried out across B.C., the RCAF advised, on July 6. The training missions will between July 7th to 10th. (Photo: supplied by Royal Canadian Air Force)

CC-177 Globemaster III aircraft flying in British Columbia

Prince Rupert is a potential stop for Canadian Air Forces training exercise

Canadian Airforces CC-177 Globemaster III aircraft may be a unique sight in the skies above Prince Rupert between July 7 and 10, the Royal Canadian Airforce announced.

Members of the 429 Transport Squadron, based out of 8 Wing Trenton, will be conducting cross-country flying training in the province of British Columbia, the public advisory stated.

Prince Rupert is one of the potential training locations, Captain Sheila Tham of the Royal Canadian Airforce told The Northern View, on July 6.

“Cross-country flying is a type of long-distance training to perform low approaches, landing, and take-offs at airports and is essential for maintaining the skills of aircrew so they are ready to safely execute Canadian Armed Forces missions around the world, often under challenging conditions.”

The landings and approaches conducted in cross-country flying sometimes occur at smaller airports that are unaccustomed to receiving Globemaster IIIs.

“It is important that these proficiencies are maintained in Canada so our aircrew are prepared to execute these manoeuvres in potentially life-threatening situations. All efforts will be made to minimize disruption to the community.”

Tham said due to many influencing factors she can’t guarantee the aircraft will be seen in the skies above the city or land in the vicinity.

“The training involves practicing approaches and/or landing at a variety of airports across B.C.,” Tham said. “I don’t want to make any promises as flying schedules are often unpredictable and may change based on weather, traffic, and other situations that are beyond our control.”

The massive aircraft of more than 174 ft (53.04m) in length and with a wingspan of 169.75 ft (51.74m) is a strategic air-lifter used to transport cargo, troops, and oversized combat equipment. Advanced avionics makes it rapid and reliable. One CC-177 Globemaster can haul three CH 146 Griffin helicopters with refuelling tanks or up to 102 paratroopers, stated the Royal Canadian Airforce on its webpage.

With a flight range of 10,279 km at Mach .74 or 568 miles per hour, the plane has the ability to land in remote airfields making it premier for military, humanitarian and peacekeeping missions, the Airforce states.

Some RCAF aircraft are larger than many passenger airplanes and may appear to be flying lower than they actually are. RCAF aircrew adheres to strict rules and regulations at all times to ensure safety. While conducting training at airports all aircrew members will remain in the aircraft.


 
K-J Millar | Journalist 
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