Boil water notice in effect for Kitsumkalum

Waterline was hit during test drilling Dec. 10

Kitsumkalum has issued a boil water notice for residents after crews hit a water line while doing test drilling for a new water line.

Heather Bohn, communications coordinator for Kitsumkalum, says the maps for the original infrastructure were outdated from when it was first installed in the early 1960s, so crews weren’t expecting to hit anything while they were drilling.

“They’re getting ready to upgrade our system because the roads will be paved next year, so they wanted to do the water lines because it’s really old infrastructure,” Bohn says. “They were doing work with an engineering company, and looking at the maps and where they were, the water line wasn’t supposed to be there is my understanding.”

READ MORE: Kitsumkalum First Nation eyes industrial transportation hub

Late last night, crews were able to put a temporary patch on to the broken water line after which the system was re-pressurized and flushed.

According to a notice posted Dec. 10, Kitsumkalum is directing members to boil water continuously for a minimum of 10 minutes before consumption.

“Water will be discoloured and highly chlorinated until the line is fully fixed,” the notice reads.

“The patch is currently holding, updates will be posted as we receive information on the final steps in fixing the break.”

Residents are now able to turn on the taps, flush toilets and run showers. However, water used for brushing teeth, drinking, cooking, washing dishes or fruits and vegetables should be boiled first.

READ MORE: Kitsumkalum Chief Don Roberts secures seventh term, new councillor wins seat

More to come.


 


brittany@terracestandard.com

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