Pelvic pain is one of the potential early symptoms of cervical cancer for women. (Supplied)

Federal Government invests $10 million towards cervical cancer research

According to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, cervical cancer is preventable

The Canadian government has invested $10 million into cervical cancer research and prevention.

According to the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, cervical cancer is one of the most preventable and treatable forms of cancer if diagnosed early on through timely physicals.

READ MORE: Kelowna oncologist changing the face of breast cancer treatment

“We know too many cervical cancers are still diagnosed at the last stage of the disease, and our government is investing in research to change that,” Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor said. “This funding will support Dr. Gina Ogilvie and her team at the Women’s Health Research Institute at BC Women’s as they explore new strategies to better prevent and treat cervical cancer for all Canadians.”

The funding will be fractioned over a five-year span to support national cervical cancer research. Initiatives will be led by world-renowned physician and researcher Dr. Gina Ogilvie and her team at the Women’s Health Research Institute at BC Women’s Hospital and Health Centre, the B.C. Elimination of Cervical Cancer Task Force, and her colleagues at the Gynaecological Cancer Initiative.

“Our team has the convergence of skills, expertise and frankly, the passion to move forward and be the global catalyst to eliminate cervical cancer,” Dr. Gina Ogilvie said.

READ MORE: Sister of cancer victim cycles across Canada to raise awareness

Studies will focus on the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and screening methods and how to implement them across the country.

Cervical cancer most commonly affects women between the ages of 35 to 59.

In 2017, approximately 1,550 Canadian women were diagnosed with cervical cancer and an estimated 400 died from it, according to statistics on cervical cancer.


@LarynGilmour
laryn.gilmour@blackpress.ca

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