Daryl Maurice and Sandro Bomben fly their remote controlled airplanes over a nearly frozen Oliver Lake on Monday, Feb. 4.(Shannon Lough / The Northern View)

Daryl Maurice and Sandro Bomben fly their remote controlled airplanes over a nearly frozen Oliver Lake on Monday, Feb. 4.(Shannon Lough / The Northern View)

Arctic outflow chills North Coast inland

Environment Canada warns of frostbite and strong winter winds

An Arctic outflow warning is in effect for North Coast inland areas including Kitimat, Terrace and Stewart.

Strong winds and unusually cold temperatures are the result of an arctic ridge of high pressure over the Interior pushing winds to coastal areas, according to Environment Canada in its weather warning. The bitter cold is expected ease off by Wednesday, Feb. 6.

In Prince Rupert, temperatures dipped as low as -11 C at 6 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 4, and hit a -2 C high by noon, with a wind chill of -6 C.

Environment Canada warns of a frostbite risk overnight.

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Temperatures are expected to hover around 0 throughout the week, with some snow in the forecast.

With consistent below-zero temperatures, Oliver Lake, 7km outside Prince Rupert, is starting to freeze over. A couple of people were out at the lake on Monday, Feb. 4 to test the ice.

Friends, Daryl Maurice and Sandro Bomben, found another way to enjoy the nearly frozen lake. They brought Carbon Cubs, remote controlled airplanes and a helicopter to fly in the open space and land smoothly on the ice.

“This is the first time we’ve flown together in a couple of years,” Maurice said.

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Shannon Lough | Editor
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Daryl Maurice and Sandro Bomben inspect one of their remote controlled airplanes that crashed into the ice on Oliver Lake on Monday, Feb. 4. (Shannon Lough / The Northern View)

Daryl Maurice and Sandro Bomben inspect one of their remote controlled airplanes that crashed into the ice on Oliver Lake on Monday, Feb. 4. (Shannon Lough / The Northern View)