Kits to help bring people back from the brink of an opioid drug overdose are now available no charge in northwestern B.C

Access to naloxone kits made easier

They’re now available from pharmacies

Kits to help bring people back from the brink of an opioid drug overdose are now available no charge in northwestern B.C.

But those picking up a kit at select pharmacies or at community health centres should expect to first receive training on how to use syringes and naloxone, the drug that reverses an overdose, indicates information from the B.C. Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC), the provincial agency which began to distribute the kits late last year.

“When asking for a kit in a pharmacy, pharmacists will either provide training directly or have a conversation to ensure people have been trained and know how to use take-home naloxone kits,” said Sara Young, BCCDC’s hepatitis and harm reduction programs manager.

“If someone has completed online training through the naloxonetraining.com website, they can print a certificate of completion, or download it on their mobile device and show this to their pharmacist.”

“The take home naloxone program is low-barrier and designed to get kits into the hands of people who need them.”

An overdose of opioids like heroin, methadone, fentanyl and morphine can slow a person’s breathing or even stop a person from breathing altogether, something that can be temporarily reversed by naloxone.

When administered along with rescue breaths, naloxone can restore breathing within a few minutes, indicates information published by the BCCDC.

The take home kits include three doses of injectable naloxone, along with three single-use syringes and related supplies.

The kits are now availabe at Save-On-Foods pharmacies in Kitimat, Terrace and Prince Rupert.

They are also available at community health centres in Kitimat, Terrace, Prince Rupert and Lax Kw’alaams.

Naloxone is commonly carried by provincial paramedics and police officers in response to the large increase of opioid overdoses being experienced in B.C. and elsewhere in Canada.

The number of overdoses and deaths began to grow with the introduction of fentanyl in illegal drug sales.

“Our most urgent priority is to keep people alive, so we’re dramatically expanding easy access to naloxone,” mental health and addictions minister Judy Darcy said in late December.

“Bringing a friend or a loved one back from the brink of death can hinge on people knowing how to use a naloxone kit and having access to one. Making them available at local pharmacies makes them more accessible than ever.”

Those interested in the online option can go to the Toward The Heart website maintained by the BCCDC at http://towardtheheart.com/naloxone-course.

Training is also available at http://www.naloxonetraining.com/.

Take-home naloxone kits have been used to reverse over 11,000 overdoses, reports the centre.

Just Posted

Regional district voters call for change

Election results in for RDKS, school board — recount ordered for Terrace Rural

Incumbents and acclaimed mayors win elections all across B.C.’s north

Fraser Lake saw their first female mayor elected

Mayoral results from across B.C.

Voters in 162 municipalities in B.C. set to elect mayor, council, school board and more

Every vote counts: 10 tightest races in B.C.’s municipal elections

Peachland saw their election decided by just one vote

Election 2018: City votes are in

All incumbents re-elected, with two newcomers

B.C. sailor surprised by humpback whale playing under her boat

Jodi Klahm-Kozicki said the experience was ‘magical’ near Denman Island

Trump vilifies caravan, says he’ll cut Central American aid

Despite Mexican efforts to stop them at the Guatemala-Mexico border, about 5,000 Central American migrants resumed their advance toward the U.S. border Sunday in southern Mexico.

Federal carbon tax rebates will exceed the cost for most people affected

Officials say 70 per cent of people in those provinces will get back more than they end up paying out as fuel costs rise to incorporate the carbon tax.

Rotating strike in Toronto will have ‘significant impact,’ says Canada Post

Canada Post union announces rotating strikes in four Canadian cities.

Cancelling Saudi Arabia arms deal would cost $1 billion: Trudeau

Canada has added its voice to global calls for answers, with Trudeau telling the CBC in an interview today that the Saudi government’s explanation of what happened lacks credibility.

Former B.C. sheriff caught in sex-related sting pleads guilty to lesser charge

Kevin Johnston will be sentenced on Nov. 6 for his role in communicating online with a person posing as a 14-year-old girl.

WWE star Roman Reigns announces he has leukemia

Grappler formerly played in CFL

China opens mega-bridge linking Hong Kong to mainland

The $20 billion bridge took almost a decade to build while incurring major delays and cost overruns

Dangerous Cat 4 Hurricane Willa closing in on Mexico coast

Officials said 7,000 to 8,000 people were being evacuated from low-lying areas, mostly in Sinaloa state

Most Read