Hey, Tim Horton’s, where’s the other 90 per cent?

Dear Editor,

“The sky is falling” is the battle cry of minimum-wage opponents: predicting layoffs, bankruptcies and major disasters. One group consists mainly of the chamber of commerce and small businesses, some of whom sincerely believe that an increase is detrimental to their livelihood. The other group is major corporations — I just listened to one CEO predicting massive layoffs and bankruptcies, while another is a direct descendant of Tim Horton who owns half a dozen stores in Ontario. She is now at her winter home on the beach in Florida contemplating on how to punish her workers: one idea is to take away their coffee break. The irony is that the original hockey player, Tim Horton, played an important role by opening his stores, which became a big part in establishing what is now part of Canadian culture, the coffee break.

The fact is wages have always increased. Fifty years ago as a union carpenter I earned $2.05 per hour. A shopping cart full of groceries was $10, which amounts to five hours of work. If I worked today I would earn $35 and the same shopping cart would take six hours of work. At minimum wage the cost is 16 hours..

I investigated several places where an increase in wages have made positive differences. Turns out they do not have the legislated minimum wage but no one earns less than $21 Canadian for one hour, if you work for McDonald’s in Copenhagen your wage is $23 per hour, with three weeks paid holiday, so you can actually afford to buy a Big Mac even though it costs 58 cents more than it does here. To put it differently the wage is almost 100 per cent higher than Canada, but the Big Mac is less than 10 per cent more. What happened to the other 90 per cent? That question should be put to the CEO.

John Jensen

Terrace, B.C.

Just Posted

Red Mountain Project given environmental approval

120 conditions from Nisga’a Nation must be followed

LNG Canada support far outweighs protests, CEO says

Andy Calitz vows completion on schedule at B.C. Natural Resource Forum

Author warns of dangerous goods being carried by rail

Bruce Campbell wrote book on Lac-Mégantic disaster

Man in hospital after weekend stabbing

Police briefs | Jan. 14-20

Canada’s archive buys rare book that hints at Nazi plans for North America

The 1944 book may have served as a blueprint for a Nazi purge

Teravainen’s 3 points lift Hurricanes to 5-2 win over Canucks

Vancouver heads into all-star break on losing note

47 men arrested by Vancouver police for allegedly seeking sex with teenage girls

Seven of those arrested have been charged as part of a two-month operation

B.C. hospital apologizes for veteran’s five-day hallway stay

Clinical director of Victoria General Hospital says case of retired veteran ‘definitely excessive’

Speaker Darryl Plecas says ‘justice’ needed for legislature employees

Plecas spoke to media at the opening of a pedestrian and cycling bridge in Abbotsford Wednesday

Advocate hopes B.C. legislature scandal leads to more transparency

‘Depressing’ that it takes a scandal to inspire freedom of information reform, says Sara Neuert

‘Dr. Lipjob’ avoids jail, gets 30-day suspended sentence

She will have to serve the 30 days in prison if she commits a breach during her two-year’s probation

Ex-Mountie involved in Taser death at Vancouver airport sues government

Kwesi Millington claims he acted in accordance with RCMP training

LETTER: Seniors home care, day programs expanding, Adrian Dix says

B.C. health minister responds to latest Seniors Advocate report

Most Read