There are eight candidates running for Skeena-Bulkley Valley, including NDP’s Taylor Bachrach, Liberal Dave Birdi, Conservative Claire Rattée, Green Party’s Mike Sawyer, Christian Heritage Party’s Rod Taylor, People’s Party Jody Craven and independent candidates Merv Ritchie and Danny Nunes.

There are eight candidates running for Skeena-Bulkley Valley, including NDP’s Taylor Bachrach, Liberal Dave Birdi, Conservative Claire Rattée, Green Party’s Mike Sawyer, Christian Heritage Party’s Rod Taylor, People’s Party Jody Craven and independent candidates Merv Ritchie and Danny Nunes.

What you need to know to vote in Canada’s federal election

Voting guide for Terrace, Kitimat up to Telegraph Creek

Voters across Canada will head to the polls Oct. 21 to elect members to the House of Commons after what has been a fairly heated federal election campaign.

Justin Trudeau is aiming to retain the incumbent Liberal Party’s majority win in 2015, while the Conservative Party leader Andrew Scheer, NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, Green Party Elizabeth May and People’s Party Maxime Bernier vie for power.

In the Skeena Bulkley-Valley, there are 187 polling stations with 25 advanced polling stations.

Here’s everything you need to know to vote in the 43rd federal election.

Who am I voting for?

There are eight candidates running for Skeena-Bulkley Valley, including NDP’s Taylor Bachrach, Liberal Dave Birdi, Conservative Claire Rattée, Green Party’s Mike Sawyer, Christian Heritage Party’s Rod Taylor, People’s Party Jody Craven and independent candidates Merv Ritchie and Danny Nunes.

Voters in the Skeena-Bulkley Valley district will have the opportunity to pose questions to seven of eight candidates vying for the seat vacated by NDP stalwart Nathan Cullen at the Terrace Standard’s candidates forum on October 17.

READ MORE: The most important issue for each of the Skeena Bulkley-Valley candidates in their own words

READ MORE: Skeena-Bulkley Valley candidates to face off in Terrace debate Oct. 17

How do I register to vote?

To vote, you must be a Canadian citizen, be at least 18 years old on election day, and prove your identity and address.

There are many ways to register to vote. If you want to do it early, use Election Canada’s Online Voter Registration Service to register before Tuesday, October 15 at 6 p.m.

To vote, you must prove your identity and address to register. You will be asked to prove your identity and address by providing the number on your driver’s license, or any government-issued ID that shows your photo, name and address. Show two pieces of ID that show your name, at least one of these must show your current address.

For a full list of accepted IDs, check this out.

If you don’t have any ID, you can declare your identity and address in writing and have someone who knows you and who is assigned to your polling station vouch for you, according to Election’s Canada. The voucher must be able to prove their identity and address, and a person can vouch for only one person.

When can I vote?

If you already know who you’re voting for, advanced polls are opened today, Oct. 11 through to Oct. 14 from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

You can vote at any Elections Canada office before Tuesday Oct. 15 at 6 p.m. The closest office to Terrace is 4647 Lakelse Avenue, Suite 101. You can also vote by mail if you apply no later than Oct. 15 at 6 p.m. at the Election’s Canada office.

If you live abroad, you can also apply through any Canadian embassy, high commission or consulate using a special ballot process.

On Election Day, vote at your assigned polling station on Monday, Oct. 21. Polls are usually open for 12 hours.

If you need a language or sign language interpreter, or other assistance, complete an online request or contact your returning officer at least six days before voting. If you have a visual impairment you can get a special “Braille Template” (a special cardboard with holes on it to make voting easier for you).

If you work on election day, no worries — under Canadian law, every employer must give employees three consecutive hours while polls are open to vote on election day without reduction in pay.

If you’re experiencing homelessness and staying in a shelter, you can use the address of the shelter as your home address, or you can use the address of a shelter or soup kitchen where you receive services as your home address.

Where can I vote?

Here is a list of all advanced and voting day polling stations for Terrace, Thornhill, Kitsumkalum, Kitselas, Stewart, Dease Lake, Telegraph Creek and the Nass Valley. Kitimat, Kitimaat Village, and Kildala are also included.

TERRACE

Advanced polls (open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) – October 11-14

  • Elks Hall, 2822 Tetrault Street

Voting day polls (open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.) – October 21

  • Coast Mountain College Longhouse, 5331 McConnell Avenue
  • Veritas School, 4836 Straume Avenue
  • Elks Hall, 2822 Tetrault Street
  • Mount Layton Hotsprings, 3739 BC-37

THORNHILL

Advanced polls (open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) – October 11-14

  • Elks Hall, 2822 Tetrault Street

Voting day polls (open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.) – October 21

  • Thornhill Community Centre, 3091 Century St.

KITSUMKALUM

Advanced polls (open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) – October 11-14

  • Elks Hall, 2822 Tetrault Street

Voting day polls (open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.) – October 21

  • Kitsumkalum Community Hall, 1 W Kalum Rd.

KITSELAS

Advanced polls (open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) – October 11-14

  • Elks Hall, 2822 Tetrault Street

Voting day polls (open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.) – October 21

  • Kitselas Band Board Room, 2225 Gitaus Rd.

KITIMAT

Advanced polls (open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) – October 11-14

  • Kitimat Valley Institute, 1352 Alexander Ave.

Voting day polls (open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.) – October 21

  • Riverlodge Recreation Centre, 654 Columbia Avenue West

  • Mount Elizabeth Secondary School, 1491 Kingfisher Ave.

KITIMAAT VILLAGE

Advanced polls (open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) – October 11-14

  • Kitimat Valley Institute, 1352 Alexander Ave.

Voting day polls (open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.) – October 21

  • Haisla Recreation Centre, 500 Gitksan Ave.

KILDALA

Advanced polls (open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) – October 11-14

  • Kitimat Valley Institute, 1352 Alexander Ave.

Voting day polls (open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.) – October 21

  • Riverlodge Recreation Centre, 654 Columbia Avenue West

NASS VALLEY

Advanced polls (open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) – October 11-14

  • Gitlaxt’aamiks Recreation and Cultural Centre, 4718 Tait Avenue, New Aiyansh

Voting day polls (open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.) – October 21

  • Laxgaltsap Recreational Hall, 441 Church Avenue
  • Gitwinksihlkw Administration Office, 3004 Ts’oohl Ts’ap
  • Gitlaxt’aamiks Recreation and Cultural Centre, 4718 Tait Avenue
  • Gingolx – Kincolith Long House, 301 Front

STEWART

Advanced polls (open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) – October 11-14

  • King Edward Hotel, 405 5th Avenue

Voting day polls (open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.) – October 21

  • King Edward Hotel, 405 5th Avenue

DEASE LAKE

Advanced polls (open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) – October 11-14

  • Dease Lake Community Hall, 2102B 1st Avenue NW

Voting day polls (open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.) – October 21

  • Dease Lake Community Hall, 2102B 1st Avenue NW

TELEGRAPH CREEK

Advanced polls (open 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.) – October 11-14

  • Dease Lake Community Hall, 2102B 1st Avenue NW

Voting day polls (open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.) – October 21

  • Tahltan Community Hall


 


brittany@terracestandard.com

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