Three human faces will be carved into the main centre sculpture, symbolizing humanity’s past, present and future. Six salmon carved from red cedar would swim around it with aluminium detailing. (Brittany Gervais photo)

Will Terrace’s new roundabout feature this art installation?

Project solidifies region’s connection to salmon

Three human faces peer from the sides of a 20-foot circular sculpture, symbolizing humanity’s past, present and future. Six 10-foot salmon carved from red cedar swim around it, aluminium details glinting in the sun with rocks below.

That’s what Dave Gordon, Skeena Salmon Art Festival Society volunteer would like to see standing in the middle of the Ministry of Transportation’s upcoming traffic circle at the four-way stop at Hwy 16 and 37.

The estimated $400,000 project would further solidify not only Terrace’s, but the region’s, identity as a salmon-bearing, First Nations culture, Gordon says. Terrace’s signature Kermode bear may have to take a step back for this one.

“I’ve been here for 40 years and I think I’ve seen one, so you can’t come here and expect to see a Kermode bear,” he says. “Salmon is present, if you want to go see a salmon you can go catch one, you can see them all over the place. Salmon is really the centre of our cultural identity.”

READ MORE: Salmon mural swims across Park Avenue building

The centre sculpture will be carved by renowned local artist Stan Bevan. The six cedar salmon swimming around the human faces represent the six species of fish in the region, and will be detailed with aluminium to symbolize the sometimes tumultuous integration of industry into Northwest society.

“Ironically people think they are in the centre of the circle which they put themselves in, but that’s not always the case,” Gordon joked.

The salmon will be carved by local artist Roderick Brown, who is well-known for his unique style. Aluminium waves cresting against the sculpture should catch the light as drivers go around the traffic circle, Gordon says.

The project’s simplistic design and gravel overlay should make it relatively easy to keep up, Gordon says.

“It identifies that you’re in First Nations territory, and we’re a salmon community, two core things to our identity that we don’t celebrate enough.”

Though Gordon stresses drivers should keep their eyes on the road, not the sculpture, when going around the traffic circle. A carved salmon, sculpture rendition and interpretive signs will be placed outside the installation for people to walk up and view.

READ MORE: Salmon Art Fest draws Terrace Art Gallery’s largest crowd ever

The project is still in its early stages with efforts to pursue funding and public support to get it off the ground.


 


brittany@terracestandard.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

COLUMN | Creating a “community of practice” inspires

Art Matters by columnist Sarah Zimmerman

Hockey puck with nails found at Terrace Sportsplex Arena

City believes it has already caused $4,000 of damage

Kitselas First Nation receives $1.2M boost for apprenticeship development program

Melanie Mark, Minister of Advanced Education announces $7.5M for six Indigenous training programs

Terrace Skating Club takes home 24 medals from regional championships

Skaters claim top spot for fifth year in a row

Officials reaching out to those in contact with Canada’s first coronavirus patient

The illness has sickened at least 1,975 people and killed 56 in China

B.C. VIEWS: New coronavirus outbreak an important reminder

Walking the line between cautious and alarmist

Kobe Bryant killed in California helicopter crash: reports

NBA star was reportedly in his private helicopter at the time of the crash

Investigation launched after six dead puppies dumped in Richmond hotel parking lot

RAPS reminds people they can always give up puppies they can’t take care of

Risk of coronavirus low in B.C. as first case emerges in Toronto: officials

There have been no confirmed cases of the virus in B.C.

‘Presumptive case’ of coronavirus in Canada confirmed by Ontario doctors

Man in his 50s felt ill on his return to Canada from Wuhan, China

People knowingly take fentanyl so make policy changes to reduce harm: B.C. study

Dr. Jane Buxton, an epidemiologist at the centre, says drug users need more resources,

‘My heart is going to bleed’: Bodies brought back to Canada following Iran plane crash

Remains of Sahar Haghjoo, 37, and her eight-year-old daughter, Elsa Jadidi, were identified last weekend

Most Read