Harmac pulp mill near Nanaimo: forest products companies are major users of electricity.

B.C. considers business sales tax relief

Finance Minister Mike de Jong considers giving up $160 million in provincial sales tax revenue added to business electricity bills

B.C. is the only place in North America that charges sales tax on business electricity bills, a cost the finance ministry is considering removing to help the struggling forest and mining industries.

The issue was identified in November when an expert panel on tax competitiveness reported back to Finance Minister Mike de Jong. It noted that the province takes in $160 million from provincial sales tax (PST) on electricity bills, part of a generally high-tax environment for business and investment in B.C. relative to the national average.

[See commission report below]

Last week, mayors of eight forest-dependent communities wrote to de Jong and Premier Christy Clark, asking for PST relief for lumber, pulp and paper producers in their communities.

“Communities in rural B.C. are not experiencing the same economic growth enjoyed in Lower Mainland communities,” wrote the mayors of North Cowichan, Quesnel, Vernon, Port Alberni, Mackenzie, Powell River, Taylor and Port Alice.

“Eliminating the PST on electricity for businesses is meaningful action you can take that would not only help the forestry industry and the jobs it supports, but will also benefit the mining industry and other energy-intensive job creators in our province.”

The finance ministry issued a statement Tuesday acknowledging that de Jong is “considering this proposal along with many other spending priorities as we prepare the upcoming provincial balanced budget and longer-term fiscal plan.”

Energy Minister Bill Bennett said the issue has come up over the years, but the Commission on Tax Competitiveness report has created a “unified focus” among groups including the B.C. Business Council, the B.C. Chamber of Commerce, the Vancouver Board of Trade as well as mining and forestry associations.

It would be a cabinet decision that would only be revealed when de Jong tables the provincial budget Feb. 21.

“Taking PST off the purchase of electricity would help pulp mills, would help the sawmills, would help the mines,” Bennett said Wednesday. “It would help small business, and B.C. is one of the only, if not the only jurisdiction that charges sales tax on purchase of electricity.”

The commission found that B.C.’s PST is an impediment to investment in machinery and equipment, which it found to be the third lowest of any Canadian province.

CommissionOnTaxCompetitiveness Nov 2016 by Tom Fletcher on Scribd

Just Posted

UPDATE: Fire northeast of Terrace under control

The 12.1-hectare fire was first discovered Saturday morning near Cedarvale

Hazelton’s Vickers creates Grateful Dead album cover

“Unbelievable, inspiring, grounding, and very exciting,” Roy Henry Vickers says of experience

Crews fighting fire northeast of Terrace

The 10-hectare fire was discovered Saturday near the Cedarvale - Kitwanga backroad

Thornhill firefighters respond to fire at Terrace asphalt paving plant

Firefighters arrived on scene to discover an oil heater ablaze

VIDEO: Visual recap of Vancouver Island MusicFest

Walk Off The Earth, Passenger, Arlo Guthrie among highlights

Trudeau’s youth council divided over Trans Mountain pipeline purchase

A letter signed by 16 past and present members was made public today, asking the federal government to reverse course

Hulk Hogan reinstated into wrestling Hall of Fame

Hogan had used racial slurs caught on video when talking about his daughter sleeping with a black man

‘Lava bomb’ through roof of tour boat injures 22 in Hawaii

“An explosion occurred near the shoreline hurling hot lava rocks towards the boat and injuring several passengers”

B.C. teen meets Nicolas Cage

Filming mob movie in downtown Vernon, B.C.

Critics claim Trump “defended a tyrant”

Trump questions US intel, not Putin, on Russia 2016 meddling

B.C. MLAs choose new children’s watchdog

Jennifer Charlesworth has worked in government, social services

B.C. reporter calls out immigration photo on social media as fake news

A Vancouver reporter is calling out a British politician for spreading fake news

Hundreds of Arctic glaciers shrinking, disappearing

Out of 1,773 glaciers, 1,353 shrank significantly between 2000 and 2016

Most Read