Indigenous

People march together at the University of British Columbia for National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Vancouver, B.C., Saturday, Sept. 30, 2023. The federal statutory holiday recognizes abuses suffered by Inuit, First Nations and Metis people at hundreds of state and church-run residential schools. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ethan Cairns

‘A shared responsibility’: quotes from the 3rd Day for Truth and Reconciliation

Hundreds gathered across Canada to mark the day on Saturday

 

The Blue Jays logo is pictured ahead of MLB baseball action in Toronto on Wednesday, April 27, 2022. Sgt. Chantal Larocque, who is an officer with the Anishinabek Police Service, sang the national anthem on Saturday as part of the Major League Baseball team’s ceremony for National Truth and Reconciliation Day. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

Indigenous police officer hopes to inspire with trilingual ‘O Canada’ at Jays game

Sgt. Chantal Larocque sang the national anthem for the team’s National Truth and Reconciliation Day ceremony

 

The Supreme Court of Canada is seen, Friday, June 16, 2023 in Ottawa. Bill C-92, or An Act Respecting First Nations, Metis and Inuit Children Youth and Families, became law in June 2019. It affirms that Indigenous nations have sole authority of their children and establishes minimum standards in caring for them. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Indigenous groups stand firm with child welfare law before Supreme Court

An Act Respecting First Nations, Metis and Inuit Children Youth and Families became law in June 2019

 

Karlene Harvey is the illustrator of the new Every Child Matters children’s book. (Medicine Wheel Publishing photo)

Indigenous artist teams with Orange Shirt Day founder for new children’s book

Phyllis Webstad, Tsilhqot’in artist to bring Every Child Matters to life for children 6 and up

Karlene Harvey is the illustrator of the new Every Child Matters children’s book. (Medicine Wheel Publishing photo)
Fresh produce is shown at a market in Toronto on Wednesday Feb. 2, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Food insecurity a ‘public health crisis’ for B.C.’s Indigenous kids

Food costs hurting First Nations children at disproportionately high levels here and across Canada

Fresh produce is shown at a market in Toronto on Wednesday Feb. 2, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
The Nisg̱a’a Nation’s flag is laid across the exterior of the custom-built crate that houses the House of Ni’isjoohl Memorial Pole onto a plane in the United Kingdom on Sept. 14. (Master Corporal Nicolas Alonso, Canadian Armed Forces, via House of Ni’isjoohl/Nisg̱a’a Lisims Government)

Nisga’a pole return marks global landmark in reconciliation reckoning

Return to B.C. from Scottish museum could mark new chapter in post-colonial relationships

The Nisg̱a’a Nation’s flag is laid across the exterior of the custom-built crate that houses the House of Ni’isjoohl Memorial Pole onto a plane in the United Kingdom on Sept. 14. (Master Corporal Nicolas Alonso, Canadian Armed Forces, via House of Ni’isjoohl/Nisg̱a’a Lisims Government)
The House of Ni’isjoohl Memorial Pole returned to Terrace on Sept. 24, symbolizing a historic homecoming. (Sailor First Class Erin Roberts, Canadian Armed Forces, via House of Ni’isjoohl/Nisg̱a’a Lisims Government)

PHOTOS: Stolen totem pole returns to Nisga’a after nearly a century in Scotland

Historic repatriation marks a significant milestone for the Nisga’a

The House of Ni’isjoohl Memorial Pole returned to Terrace on Sept. 24, symbolizing a historic homecoming. (Sailor First Class Erin Roberts, Canadian Armed Forces, via House of Ni’isjoohl/Nisg̱a’a Lisims Government)
Members of the Gitxaala Nation, including Chief Councillor Linda Innes, front right, march to B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver, B.C., Monday, April 3, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Court rules B.C. must fix mineral claims system after Gitxaala challenge

Judge says B.C. has a duty to consult, but rejects bid to quash existing claims

Members of the Gitxaala Nation, including Chief Councillor Linda Innes, front right, march to B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver, B.C., Monday, April 3, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Mohawk artist Lee Claremont presents to the Indigenous Art Studio class at Mount Boucherie Secondary School. (Photo courtesy of Jim Elwood)

New B.C. grad requirement introduces students to local Indigenous teachings

Some school districts developing unique courses alongside First Nations to fulfill new requirement

Mohawk artist Lee Claremont presents to the Indigenous Art Studio class at Mount Boucherie Secondary School. (Photo courtesy of Jim Elwood)
A sign of an orange shirt is attached to a fence during a Truth and Reconciliation walk in Saskatoon, Sask., on Friday, September 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Heywood Yu

Indigenous businesses striving for Truth and Reconciliation

Shopping for something to wear on Orange Shirt Day? Here’s what you need to know

A sign of an orange shirt is attached to a fence during a Truth and Reconciliation walk in Saskatoon, Sask., on Friday, September 30, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Heywood Yu
Small Eyes, an animal ambassador, is one of the Northern Spotted Owls that is part of the breeding program in Langley. As of July 25, three owls — two males and one female — are living in the wild in Fraser Canyon/Spuzzum First Nation territory. (Kemone Moodley/Hope Standard)

Second release brings B.C.’s wild spotted owl population from 1 to 3

Two male owls join one female owl in Fraser Canyon

Small Eyes, an animal ambassador, is one of the Northern Spotted Owls that is part of the breeding program in Langley. As of July 25, three owls — two males and one female — are living in the wild in Fraser Canyon/Spuzzum First Nation territory. (Kemone Moodley/Hope Standard)
Women dance during the Abyas song to cleanse and bless the ground for the cedar mortuary pole replica carved by Mungo Martin in 1955 was removed from Thunderbird Park during a commemorative ceremony on the grounds of the Royal B.C. Museum in Victoria, B.C., on Wednesday, June 5, 2019. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito)

‘Forbidden Music’ explores complex preservation of B.C. Indigenous culture

Film documents 1950s efforts to preserve music threatened by potlatch ban, residential schools

Women dance during the Abyas song to cleanse and bless the ground for the cedar mortuary pole replica carved by Mungo Martin in 1955 was removed from Thunderbird Park during a commemorative ceremony on the grounds of the Royal B.C. Museum in Victoria, B.C., on Wednesday, June 5, 2019. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito)
The Survivors’ Flag hangs to honour Indigenous Peoples who were forced to attend residential schools, on the grounds of the legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Wednesday, September 28, 2022. A Fraser Valley First Nation is expected to provide an update on its work into missing children and unmarked burials at three former residential school sites. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

B.C. First Nation set to reveal initial findings in residential school probe

Investigation has been ongoing into schools in Mission, Chilliwack and Yale

The Survivors’ Flag hangs to honour Indigenous Peoples who were forced to attend residential schools, on the grounds of the legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Wednesday, September 28, 2022. A Fraser Valley First Nation is expected to provide an update on its work into missing children and unmarked burials at three former residential school sites. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
British Columbia’s environment minister says Joffre Lakes Provincial Park will remain closed until next Friday, after public access was shut down by two First Nations more than two weeks ago. George Heyman speaks during an announcement at Burns Bog, in Delta, B.C., on Monday, June 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C.’s Joffre Lakes Park set to remain closed for another week

First Nations halting temporarily access to ‘harvest and gather’ resources

British Columbia’s environment minister says Joffre Lakes Provincial Park will remain closed until next Friday, after public access was shut down by two First Nations more than two weeks ago. George Heyman speaks during an announcement at Burns Bog, in Delta, B.C., on Monday, June 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
The first mobile overdose prevention site in B.C. on First Nations land opened at Cheam First Nation. Cheam OPS staff Kristi Colp, Sharon Downing, Brandon Krilow, and Myra Seymour pose with the bus on opening day, Sept. 1, 2023. (Cheam First Nation/ Facebook)

Indigenous-led overdose prevention site the 1st of its kind in B.C.

Cheam site aimed helping prevent ODs in customized bus with trained staff who also test drugs

The first mobile overdose prevention site in B.C. on First Nations land opened at Cheam First Nation. Cheam OPS staff Kristi Colp, Sharon Downing, Brandon Krilow, and Myra Seymour pose with the bus on opening day, Sept. 1, 2023. (Cheam First Nation/ Facebook)
FILE - In this March 25, 2016, file photo, the sun sets over the Badger-Two Medicine area near Browning, Mont. A Louisiana company will relinquish the last remaining oil and gas lease on land near Montana's Glacier National Park that's sacred to Native Americans in the U.S. and Canada, under a legal agreement announced Friday, Sept. 1, 2023, that would resolve a decades-long dispute. (Greg Lindstrom/Flathead Beacon via AP, File)

U.S. company gets $2.6M to relinquish oil lease on sacred Native American land

The deal would resolve a decades-long dispute over the 25-sq.-km. oil, gas lease in the mountainous area

FILE - In this March 25, 2016, file photo, the sun sets over the Badger-Two Medicine area near Browning, Mont. A Louisiana company will relinquish the last remaining oil and gas lease on land near Montana's Glacier National Park that's sacred to Native Americans in the U.S. and Canada, under a legal agreement announced Friday, Sept. 1, 2023, that would resolve a decades-long dispute. (Greg Lindstrom/Flathead Beacon via AP, File)
Joffre Lakes Provincial Park, 2019. (Black Press Media files)

Joffre Lakes Provincial Park to stay open over Labour Day weekend

It will then be inaccessible starting Sept. 5 as the province, Lil’wat Nation have ongoing talks

Joffre Lakes Provincial Park, 2019. (Black Press Media files)
English River First Nation Chief Jenny Wolverine, centre, says it’s believed 79 areas at the Beauval Indian Residential School could be the size of possible children’s graves and 14 are the size of infants, Saskatoon, Wednesday, August 29, 2023.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kelly Geraldine

Residential school radar finds 93 Saskatchewan ‘areas of interest’

Findings at Beauval Indian Residential School could be graves of children and infants

English River First Nation Chief Jenny Wolverine, centre, says it’s believed 79 areas at the Beauval Indian Residential School could be the size of possible children’s graves and 14 are the size of infants, Saskatoon, Wednesday, August 29, 2023.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kelly Geraldine
People attend a Red Dress Day ceremony marking the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirited people in Canada, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, May 5, 2022. Racism and the lack of primary care providers mean off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit females have poorer health overall compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts, says a study by the Public Health Agency of Canada.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Racism factor in unequal health care provided Indigenous women: PHAC study

‘Colonialism isn’t historic, it’s ongoing — these harms are continuing and they’re perpetuated still’

People attend a Red Dress Day ceremony marking the National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, and Two-Spirited people in Canada, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, May 5, 2022. Racism and the lack of primary care providers mean off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit females have poorer health overall compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts, says a study by the Public Health Agency of Canada.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Amy Parent, right, is shown with the Ni’isjoohl memorial pole alongside Nisga’a Chief Earl Stephens during a visit to the National Museum of Scotland in this handout image provided by National Museums Scotland. Parent says the pole is set to begin its month-long journey home to the Nisga’a Nation in northwestern British Columbia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-National Museums Scotland-Neil Hanna

Nisga’a memorial pole about to start journey home to B.C. from Scottish museum

Pole is set to make its journey to the Nass Valley in the belly of a Canadian military aircraft

Amy Parent, right, is shown with the Ni’isjoohl memorial pole alongside Nisga’a Chief Earl Stephens during a visit to the National Museum of Scotland in this handout image provided by National Museums Scotland. Parent says the pole is set to begin its month-long journey home to the Nisga’a Nation in northwestern British Columbia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-National Museums Scotland-Neil Hanna