Cancer

Vials of blood from a participant in a clinical study of the effectiveness of a new liquid biopsy technology are packaged for shipment at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Ore., on March 14, 2022. The clinical trial will follow hundreds of participants for three years to see if signals of any cancers that participants later develop were present in their blood. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)

Can cancer blood tests live up to their promise of saving lives?

U.S. government researchers are planning a large experiment to test effectiveness

Vials of blood from a participant in a clinical study of the effectiveness of a new liquid biopsy technology are packaged for shipment at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Ore., on March 14, 2022. The clinical trial will follow hundreds of participants for three years to see if signals of any cancers that participants later develop were present in their blood. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
Catherine getting ready for the next round of chemo, with her three kids for support. (GoFundMe/Special to The News)

B.C. family in need of support after mother’s stage 4 breast cancer diagnosis

Seek funds to cover treatment and care for their three autism-diagnosed kids

Catherine getting ready for the next round of chemo, with her three kids for support. (GoFundMe/Special to The News)
Steve Fonyo, who raised millions for cancer research by running across Canada on an artificial limb, has died. Fonyo is shown dippping his artifical limb in the Pacific Ocean in Victoria after completing his cross-country run in this 1985 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody

Steve Fonyo, who lost leg to cancer and ran across Canada to raise funds, dead at 56

Fonyo lost a leg to cancer when he was 12, became a national hero after completing a Canada-wide marathon

Steve Fonyo, who raised millions for cancer research by running across Canada on an artificial limb, has died. Fonyo is shown dippping his artifical limb in the Pacific Ocean in Victoria after completing his cross-country run in this 1985 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Premier John Horgan makes his first public appearance since completing cancer treatment for Lunar New Year at the B.C. legislature on Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2022. (John Horgan/Twitter)

Horgan celebrates Lunar New Year at B.C. legislature after multi-week cancer treatment

Event was the B.C. premier’s first public appearance since completing cancer treatment

Premier John Horgan makes his first public appearance since completing cancer treatment for Lunar New Year at the B.C. legislature on Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2022. (John Horgan/Twitter)
B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks at a press conference in Vancouver on September 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Premier Horgan completes throat cancer treatment, says he’s ‘feeling better every day’

B.C.’s premier was diagnosed with throat cancer in fall 2021

B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks at a press conference in Vancouver on September 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
New studies suggest constant light alcohol consumption puts you at risk for various cancers just as much as binge drinking. (Pixabay photo)

Light alcohol consumption just as risky as binge drinking, BC Cancer study says

One out of seven new cancers were caused by light to moderate drinking in 2020

New studies suggest constant light alcohol consumption puts you at risk for various cancers just as much as binge drinking. (Pixabay photo)
Premier John Horgan makes his address during the BC NDP virtual convention on Saturday, Dec. 12, 2021. (BC NDP)

B.C. Premier John Horgan says throat cancer prognosis is ‘very, very good’

Premier expected to start treatment over next couple of days

Premier John Horgan makes his address during the BC NDP virtual convention on Saturday, Dec. 12, 2021. (BC NDP)
This image provided by the National Institutes of Health shows an osteosarcoma cell with DNA in blue, energy factories (mitochondria) in yellow and actin filaments, part of the cellular skeleton, in purple. Eight years ago, a team of researchers launched a project to carefully repeat influential lab experiments in cancer research. They recreated 50 experiments, the type of work with mice and test tubes that sets the stage for new cancer drugs. They reported the results Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021: About half the scientific claims didn’t hold up. (National Institute of Health via AP)

Study can’t confirm lab results for many cancer experiments

New study reflects on shortcomings early in the scientific process

This image provided by the National Institutes of Health shows an osteosarcoma cell with DNA in blue, energy factories (mitochondria) in yellow and actin filaments, part of the cellular skeleton, in purple. Eight years ago, a team of researchers launched a project to carefully repeat influential lab experiments in cancer research. They recreated 50 experiments, the type of work with mice and test tubes that sets the stage for new cancer drugs. They reported the results Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021: About half the scientific claims didn’t hold up. (National Institute of Health via AP)
FILE – B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks in Vancouver, on Thursday, September 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

B.C. Premier John Horgan diagnosed with cancer following throat biopsy

Premier expected to make a full recovery

FILE – B.C. Premier John Horgan speaks in Vancouver, on Thursday, September 16, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
To celebrate finishing his first round of chemotherapy, Addison Johnston (left) and his younger brother Ryland were taken to a Japanese restaurant in Vancouver by parents Kristin and Shane Johnston. But lots of treatment remains for the teenager, and his family has learned some hard lessons about the healthcare system. (submitted photo)

Chilliwack parents discover gaps in health care as teenage son battles leukemia

Though he’s 17-years-old, Addison Johnston couldn’t access treatment at B.C. Children’s Hospital

To celebrate finishing his first round of chemotherapy, Addison Johnston (left) and his younger brother Ryland were taken to a Japanese restaurant in Vancouver by parents Kristin and Shane Johnston. But lots of treatment remains for the teenager, and his family has learned some hard lessons about the healthcare system. (submitted photo)
Seven-year-old Eva Mailhot Maclean plays in a playground in Montreal, Saturday, May 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

B.C. study probes if more time in the shade as a child prevents skin cancer in adulthood

Researchers will install shade structures outside and track preschool-age children for six months while they play

Seven-year-old Eva Mailhot Maclean plays in a playground in Montreal, Saturday, May 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
Northwest cancer patients in medical trials may soon have access to follow-ups closer to home. Dr. Rob Olson stands in front of a linear accelerator at the BC Cancer - Prince George centre. The machine is used to deliver SABR treatment to clinical trial patients. (Photo: supplied)

Pilot project brings access to care closer to home for Terrace cancer patients

Northwest B.C. will be the first region to partner in the international clinical trial project

Northwest cancer patients in medical trials may soon have access to follow-ups closer to home. Dr. Rob Olson stands in front of a linear accelerator at the BC Cancer - Prince George centre. The machine is used to deliver SABR treatment to clinical trial patients. (Photo: supplied)
(Simon Dawson/Pool via AP)

Canadian researchers developing blood test to detect lung cancer early and save lives

‘If lung cancer is detected early then treatment outcomes improve enormously,’ says Dr. David Wishart

(Simon Dawson/Pool via AP)
Kandace “Kandy” and Donnie Musgrove on their wedding day. (McKenzie Shea Photography)

With days left to live, Vancouver Island woman gets dream wedding

Community vendors pull together to deliver free, last minute wedding

Kandace “Kandy” and Donnie Musgrove on their wedding day. (McKenzie Shea Photography)
Diane Van Keulen, shown in a handout photo, a lung cancer patient from Ontario, has been battling the disease since 2019. She says she delayed her potential recovery and treatment out of fear of COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS

Doctors fear an impending wave of cancer patients after COVID-19 delays

Cancer research has also suffered during the pandemic due to the cancellation of major fundraisers

Diane Van Keulen, shown in a handout photo, a lung cancer patient from Ontario, has been battling the disease since 2019. She says she delayed her potential recovery and treatment out of fear of COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS
Dwayne Buckle finished his 1,400 km “Hike for the Cure” on Sunday (Jan. 10) by walking down Highway 19 all the way to Carrot Park, and then jumping into the freezing cold Tsulquate ocean. (Tyson Whitney - North Island Gazette)

VIDEO: Icy plunge marks end of Red Deer firefighter’s trek across B.C. for cancer

Dwayne Buckle completes 12-week march from Red Deer to Port Hardy

Dwayne Buckle finished his 1,400 km “Hike for the Cure” on Sunday (Jan. 10) by walking down Highway 19 all the way to Carrot Park, and then jumping into the freezing cold Tsulquate ocean. (Tyson Whitney - North Island Gazette)
The parents of 12-year-old Halle Krawczyk of Salmon Arm received welcome news on Dec. 7, 2020 that the Medical Services Plan has reversed its decision and would fund her surgery in the United States for a rare cancer. However, the family is told they are still faced with at least $150,000 in additional expenses to be incurred during the six months in the U.S. throughout the surgery and recovery. (Contributed)

MSP to fund Salmon Arm girl’s surgery to combat rare cancer after reversing decision

Medical Services Plan reverses decision to not help with U.S. cost, parents still face $150,000 bill

The parents of 12-year-old Halle Krawczyk of Salmon Arm received welcome news on Dec. 7, 2020 that the Medical Services Plan has reversed its decision and would fund her surgery in the United States for a rare cancer. However, the family is told they are still faced with at least $150,000 in additional expenses to be incurred during the six months in the U.S. throughout the surgery and recovery. (Contributed)
Comox Valley resident Gogs Gagnon book will be distributed to new prostate cancer patients in B.C. Photo supplied.

B.C. man’s book will be distributed to new prostate cancer patients throughout the province

Gogs Gagnon’s book to be included in Prostate Cancer Foundation BC’s kits

Comox Valley resident Gogs Gagnon book will be distributed to new prostate cancer patients in B.C. Photo supplied.
Dwayne Buckle on Hightway 1 en-route from Red Deer to Port Hardy. (Submitted photo)The long road ahead. (Dwayne Buckle photo)

Alberta man walking over 1,000 km through B.C. to honour family lost to cancer

“I’ll do anything I can to get a cure for this disease. If I had to walk to the moon, I would.”

Dwayne Buckle on Hightway 1 en-route from Red Deer to Port Hardy. (Submitted photo)The long road ahead. (Dwayne Buckle photo)
In recognition of Lung Cancer Awareness Month, Fruitvale resident Jack LaRocque wants people to know that anyone can be affected by lung cancer, even non-smokers. Photo: Jim Bailey

Kootenay man shares experience, non-smokers get lung cancer too

November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month

In recognition of Lung Cancer Awareness Month, Fruitvale resident Jack LaRocque wants people to know that anyone can be affected by lung cancer, even non-smokers. Photo: Jim Bailey