Remote controlled cars draw fair crowd

Spectators lined the fence, cheering as remote controlled miniature cars jumped and flipped around a newly-prepared track during the fair.

Fast gaining in popularity

Spectators lined the fence, cheering as remote controlled miniature cars jumped and flipped around a newly-prepared track during the Skeena Valley Fall Sept. 5.

It was the first full public viewing of the track located on the Thornhill Community Grounds and coordinator Rod Steele from the Northwest R/C Club said the event drew a lot of young people and that there was high interest during freestyle events.

“Parents were saying they couldn’t get the kids away,” he said. “I think next year there is going to be people coming down to watch that because there was lots of ‘oohs’ and ‘ahhs’ and cheering.”

Steele says the open house drew quite a number of people, but there was a misunderstanding as a lot of people thought cars were provided and didn’t bring their own.

There were a few cars that people could use, but with each worth between $350 and $1,300 he says people will have to bring their own at future events.

The freestyle event gave three minutes for each of the six racers involved to put on the best show they could. The club got the crowd involved, with five judges holding up numbered score cards after each run.

During racing events, 15 cars sped around the track, with officials counting how many laps they made in a six-minute timeframe.

Looking into the future, Steele says one goal is to get a storage container to use for a drivers’ stand.

They also plan to improve the track’s public address system.

“And we’re going to step up the freestyle: we’re going to have more jumps and more entries. [With all the interest] I don’t think that is going to be a problem at all,” Steele said.

Eight people at the races signed up for club membership last weekend.

In freestyle, Andrew Kennedy took first, Carter Steele second, and Jeremy Dewalt third. In the beginner class, Dylan Nunes won first, Levi Leonardes won second, and Trey Kennedy won third. In the 4×4 buggy class, Craig Mills won first, Ken McColl second, and Rod Steele third. In 4×4 short course A, first went to Ken McColl, second to Craig Mills, and third to Andrew Kennedy. In 4×4 short course B, first went to Lenay Smith, second to Dylan Nunes, and third to Trey Kennedy.

In the two-wheel drive buggy class, Craig Mills won first, Ken Mccoll won second, and Rod Steele third. In two wheel drive short course, Ryan Titcom won first, Dave Essay won second, and Mike Prest third.

 

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