President praises nearly 1,800 volunteers at B.C. Games

Ashley Wadhwani sits down with the Kamloops 2018 B.C. Winter Games President Niki Remesz

Volunteering since she graduated university, Niki Remesz is taking on her biggest challenge yet — all with a can-do attitude.

The Kamloops 2018 B.C. Winter Games president has been preparing for this weekend’s events for the last 18 months along with a crew of more than a dozen directors and about 1,800 volunteers.

“It was really a labour of love, there are 17 of us as board of directors, myself as president, vice president Maureen McCurdy and then 15 [other] board of directors,” Remesz told Black Press Media.

“We each have a section, whether that is a protocol, whether that is special events, whether it’s accreditation and participant services, it’s all broken down into very manageable bites.”

RELATED: That’s a wrap: B.C. Games results after Day 1

Remesz didn’t blink an eye at the undertaking of putting on the games crediting the city for making it all little easier to grasp.

“There is nothing like volunteering that really make you feel like you’re part of a community,” she said. “Living in the tournament capital, it is really easy to get involved whether that is sporting events or arts and culture.”

Although taking place mid-winter in the Interior of the province the issue of too much snow or not enough snow, did give Remesz a slight concern.

She explained the board of directors planned well for the outdoor events and the more than 10 centimetres of snow that fell on Friday was a welcomed surprise for those who organized the games.

“When I was asked more than a year-and-a-half-ago to take on this position and I chatted with my husband first, to see if I should take on this position. He said, ‘what if we don’t get any snow?’” she explained.

“I laugh now thinking back 18 months ago, we have so much snow, we are in a snow belt and it’s the perfect backdrop for the Winter Games.”

RELATED: Snowboarders sliding into fresh territory at B.C. Games

Beyond the competition, Remesz and the board have planned many events to keep the athletes entertained from dinner parties to dances at Thompson Rivers University, to indoor activities.

“Kids can come and hang out, hang out with their new friends and they love it,” said Remesz. “They are creating really great memories.”


@Jen_zee
jen.zielinski@bpdigital.ca

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