Whose national interest does the Senate committee serve?

Dear Editor,

The recent Senate committee hearing on Bill C-48, the tanker moratorium, in Terrace displayed the limited capacity and thus credibility of the committee.

Nowhere did the senators take up climate change or global warming, the core issue, nor did any but a few of the presenters address it. Instead, compassion went to the oil economy and India and China in their attempt to escape “energy poverty.” Google “Chinese city at night” to see the self-inflicted poverty they suffer.

One pro-tanker senator, thinking hypocrisy, demonstrated his own unwitting when he not unjustifiably asked how eco-tourists got to their destination. His gloating over the reply revealed an obtuseness that should have excluded him from the committee. Likewise, a pro-tanker presenter, when asked afterward for his view of climate change, said only that climate is always changing, showing his own impoverishment.

Burning hydrocarbon is now only immoral. In the not-too-distant future, it will be illegal. To build a pipeline to the coast for tankers, regardless of the quality of build, ultimately wastes money, worsens the crisis, degrades trade, and deepens the Canadian malaise. Plastic proliferation exacerbates the problem, the Great Pacific Garbage Patch the critical warning.

Jobs and the “national interest” are at stake, they say. What, then, to do for work? Nothing that is immoral or criminal. For direction, look to the former Canadian banker Mark Carney, now Britain’s chief banker, who on the same day as the Senate hearing warned of the neglect demonstrated by it.

Northwest BC is the front line of the climate crisis in Canada. Driving it is the flawed global economic model. Take a job in it, you have to justify betrayal not just of yours but everyone’s future.

As for “national interest”, whose nation, whose interest? Not our childrens’.

David Heinimann

Terrace, B.C.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Hamhuis hangs up his skates

The Nashville Predators defenceman and Smithereen spent 16 years in the NHL

Terrace and District Aquatic Centre to reopen in September

City lays out pandemic safety plans for reopening indoor recreation spaces, including pool and arena

Province, feds, Wet’suwet’en announce progress in MOU talks

Community engagement process launched to implement northern B.C. First Nation’s rights and title

Province, feds, Wet’suwet’en announce progress in MOU talks

External community engagement process launched to help implement Wet’suwet’en rights and title

Terrace Off Road Cycling Association’s HuB project is close to completion

Additional grant funding means the pump track will be asphalt instead of dirt

‘Don’t kill my mom’: Ryan Reynolds calls on young British Columbians to be COVID-smart

‘Deadpool’ celebrity responds to premier’s call for social influence support

Captain Horvat’s OT marker lifts Canucks to 4-3 win over Blues

Vancouver takes 2-0 lead in best-of-7 NHL playoff series with St. Louis

Widow of slain Red Deer doctor thanks community for support ahead of vigil

Fellow doctors, members of the public will gather for a physically-distanced vigil in central Alberta

Protesters showcase massive old yellow cedar as Port Renfrew area forest blockade continues

9.5-foot-wide yellow cedar measured by Ancient Forest Alliance campaigners in Fairy Creek watershed

Taking dog feces and a jackhammer to neighbourhood dispute costs B.C. man $16,000

‘Pellegrin’s actions were motivated by malice …a vindictive, pointless, dangerous and unlawful act’

Racist stickers at Keremeos pub leaves group uneasy and angry

The ‘OK’ hand gesture is a known hate-symbol

VIDEO: World responds to B.C. girl after pandemic cancels birthday party

Dozens of cards and numerous packages were delivered to six-year-old Charlie Manning

Expected fall peak of COVID-19 in Canada could overwhelm health systems: Tam

National modelling projections released Friday show an expected peak in cases this fall

Most Read