Editorial: Long game

Deal between pipeline builder TransCanada and the Nisga’a Lisims Government is an example of patience and quiet background maneuvering

There’s no better example of the kind of patience and quiet background maneuvering which mark the liquefied natural gas industry than the deal between pipeline builder TransCanada and the Nisga’a Lisims Government.

In return for TransCanada’s Prince Rupert Gas Transmission pipeline to cross through Nisga’a lands to a planned LNG plant near Prince Rupert, the Nisga’a obtained a number of benefits, the most intriguing of which is an option whereby TransCanada could expand its pipeline capacity for a LNG plant backed by the Nisga’a themselves.

What shape this option might take isn’t known – TransCanada says answers to questions of a commercial nature would be inappropriate – and the Nisga’a, who are quietly marketing their idea, would need to sign up a deep-pockets partner who could secure a gas supply, have the wherewithal to build a facility and find customers.

Substantive First Nations involvement in energy projects isn’t new – after nearly a decade of up and down business deals the Haisla at Kitimat are on the verge of success by participating in a barge-based LNG plant.

But the key message here is that inasmuch as LNG is an international industry marked by massive players in a huge-stakes environment taking years to unfold, there’s room for some kind of northwestern B.C. presence through area First Nations. And that stands to benefit us all.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Still a lot of work to do to fully connect regional district

Draft strategy shows dependence on on single fibre optic cable route, poor cellular service on roads

A second wave of COVID-19 is probable, if history tells us anything

B.C.’s top doctor says that what health officials have learned this round will guide response in future

Flooding highly unlikely this year throughout Skeena watershed

Region’s snowpack among lowest in the province

BC Transit focused on making buses safer and more comfortable in Phase Two of BC’s Restart Plan

All Terrace buses will have vinyl barriers to protect drivers by June 1

Student food pack demand soars because of school closure

Starfish program now delivers food to students’ homes

Facing changes together: your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

Kelowna man charged with harming a hamster

The 20-year-old Kelowna man faces several animal cruelty charges

High tech fish transport system set up to ‘whoosh’ salmon past Big Bar landslide

Fish will spend roughly 20 seconds inside the system, moving at roughly 20 metres per second

Trudeau to seek 10 days of paid sick leave for Canadian workers, says talks are ongoing

Paid sick leave is key to keeping COVID-19 spread under control, prime minister says

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

Snowbirds jets will not be leaving Kamloops, just yet

The Snowbirds have been in Kamloops since May 17 when a plane crashed killing Capt. Jennifer Casey

COVID-19 checkpoints ‘up to them,’ Bonnie Henry says of remote B.C. villages

Support local tourism economy, but only if you’re invited in

Vancouver Island hasn’t seen a new homegrown case of COVID-19 in two weeks

Island’s low and steady transmission rate chalked up to several factors

Most Read