Editorial: Growth

The city’s Skeena Industrial Development Park is suddenly front and centre at the family supper table

IT WAS for years treated almost as the City of Terrace’s unacknowledged offspring, muttered about in private (or not-so-private depending upon the occasion) and regarded as an embarrassment.

But look at it now. The city’s Skeena Industrial Development Park is suddenly front and centre at the family supper table, regarded warmly by one and all.

Within a few short months, three separate parcels of the park, located just south of the Northwest Regional Airport, have either been sold, have an interested and motivated buyer or are on the verge of being sold.

In total the three deals represent approximately 200 acres or about 10 per cent of the potential park size.

All three deals relate to the potential industrial development of the region – two for companies who would take part in projects and one, a natural-gas fired electrical generating station, to supply power when needed for liquefied natural gas plants.

And as such all three solidify the city’s key attribute which is, to quote a real estate mantra, location, location, location.

For while the city may not be home to any large scale development, its geographic setting lends itself to being the central service and support centre for that development. The astonishing growth of airport passenger traffic and proposals for new hotels all point to that attribute and industrial park activity will only add to the evolution of a new Terrace.