Dare to dream for a musical game

Could a hockey game similar to Guns and Hoses be organized to support music students through the Dare to Dream Foundation?

Hockey is a subject that rarely sneaks into my social life unless general news mentions the  likes of   Gordie Howe, a Saskatchewan farm boy who grew up not that far from my  parents farm. But recent notice of the sixth annual  charity ice competition pending between RCMP and Terrace firefighters raised the topic during a coffee klatch at my kitchen table.

Over its five year existence, Guns and Hoses has raised about $40,000 for Jump Start Terrace, a charity that connects local kids with money for sports equipment and programs. According to a news report in The Terrace Standard, last year’s charity game raised $6,700. That’s an impressive amount of dollars from one evening of fun.

And fun it is, no doubt.

In this town hockey ranks at the top of favourite pastimes for many adults. I’ve heard tell that Mounties new to town make two stops upon arrival — first they report to their commanding officer at the police station, then sign up to play on a pickup hockey team.

RCMP  regularly win these Guns and Hoses competitions. With  more players to choose from, they can assemble a stronger team while Terrace Firefighters, restricted to their smaller union staff, have less players to choose from as they field the strongest possible team.

Noting the sizeable proceeds of a single game, one parent set down her coffee mug to suggest proposing a charity game between Thornhill and Kitimat firefighters with proceeds to support Dare to Dream band students.

The suggestion has merit.

All Dare to Dream band students attend School District 82. Both fire halls are in School District 82. Chances are both fire halls have firefighters who are also keen hockey players. If they’re short the requisite number to make up a team – however many that is – they could agree to bolster their teams with community members, drawn by lottery to give every potential player an equal opportunity to make the team.

As for good use of any monetary proceeds, I don’t think Dare to Dream has ever found itself overly flush with funds to pay for instruments or hire experienced band instructors each spring to conduct specialty classes for budding musicians.

One week of out-of-town band instructors costs Dare to Dream $20,000 including meals and hotel rooms. Even at that remuneration, guest instructors are largely donating their valuable time for the advancement of local student musicians.

As a bonus, both communities would have the joy of attending one more lively on-ice competition before ice is taken out in the spring.

The firefighters I’ve spoken with expressed interest in such a friendly competition for the betterment of student musicians.

While we’re considering encouragement of band students, I’ll mention a program launched in the spring of 2016 in New York City where anyone who owns a “gently used” musical instrument no longer being played is invited to donate it for distribution to under-resourced music and arts programs in schools. This year, more than 2,000 instruments were collected. Donations ranged from staples of orchestra and band programs, to nearly 100 accordions and everything in between: a harp, a sitar, an erhu.

A music store takes on the task of making any necessary repairs. In lieu of instruments, cash donations are appreciated.

Both my grandchildren were Dare to Dream band members. One played alto sax, the other flute and baritone sax. Both enjoyed their classes and band trips, and learned to play so they were enjoyable to listen to.

If the two fire halls skated for Dare to Dream, I wouldn’t warm a bench, but I would donate a ticket.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

(Phil McLachlan/Capital News)
Murder charge laid in February 2020 stabbing death of Smithers man

Michael Egenolf is charged with the second-degree murder of Brodie Cumiskey

Island Health chief medical officer Dr. Richard Stanwick receives a first dose of Pfizer vaccine, Dec. 22, 2020. (B.C. government)
COVID-19: B.C. seniors aged 90+ can start to sign up for vaccination on March 8

Long-term care residents protected by shots already given

The Majagaleehl Gali Aks Elementary School in Hazelton is being shut down for a week by the Gitanmaax Band Council following a confirmation of a COVID-19 exposure there on Feb. 26. (Black Press Media File Photo)
COVID-19 exposure notice shuts down Hazelton school

Closure to last for one week and school is to be sanitized

MacCarthy GM staff and customers raised $700 for Pink Shirt Day. (Submitted Photo/Mudit Mehta)
Terrace dealership raises hundreds of dollars for Pink Shirt Day

MacCarthy GM staff and customers raised $700 for anti-bullying initiatives

A health care worker prepares to test a Coastal GasLink field worker for COVID-19. (Coastal GasLink photo)
Coastal GasLink begins COVID screening of pipeline workers

Construction is once again ramping up following Northern Health approval of COVID management plan

Langley resident Carrie MacKay shared a video showing how stairs are a challenge after spending weeks in hospital battling COVID-19 (Special to Langley Advance Times)
VIDEO: Stairs a challenge for B.C. woman who chronicled COVID-19 battle

‘I can now walk for six (to) 10 minutes a day’

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s coronavirus situation, May 8, 2020. (B.C. government photo)
B.C.’s weekend COVID-19 cases: 532 Saturday, 508 Sunday, 438 Monday

Fraser Health still has most, eight more coronavirus deaths

B.C. Attorney General David Eby speaks in the legislature, Dec. 7, 2020. Eby was given responsibility for housing after the October 2020 provincial election. (Hansard TV)
B.C. extends COVID-19 rent freeze again, to the end of 2021

‘Renoviction’ rules tightened, rent capped to inflation in 2022

Face mask hangs from a rear-view mirror. (Black Press image)
B.C. CDC unveils guide on how to carpool during the pandemic

Wearing masks, keeping windows open key to slowing the spread of COVID-19

Churches, including Langley’s Riverside Calvary Church, are challenging the regulations barring them from holding in-person worship services during COVID-19. (Langley Advance Times file)
Det. Sgt. Jim Callender. (Hamilton Police Service screenshot)
B.C. man dead, woman seriously injured after shooting in Hamilton, Ont.

The man was in the process of moving to the greater Toronto area, police say

(Black Press file photo)
Child in critical condition, homicide investigators probe incident near Agassiz

The child was transported to hospital but is not expected to survive

Sewage plant in Lower Mainland, operated by Metro Vancouver. (Metro Vancouver screenshot)
‘Poop tracker’ launches as researchers test Lower Mainland sewage water for COVID-19

‘Studying the virus in wastewater allows researchers to look at an entire population…’

Most Read