Covering the Missing and Murdered Women’s Inquiry when it came into town last fall is something reporter Marisca Bakker will never forget. File photo

Bye-bye for baby

Reporter Marisca Bakker says reuniting a family perfect way to leave (for now) as she grows hers.

This is my last week working for The Interior News before my maternity leave begins (again) and what a week to (temporarily) end my job for the next year. I had the privilege of helping an adopted man find his biological mother and witness a reunion made for TV.

Not all weeks are like this in this business. Mostly, reporters in small towns cover council meetings, pour over town budget numbers, take photos of high school sports and count how many times a politician can say the word “folks” in a single speech.

All these things are important but sometimes can feel mundane. Other times, this job is fun. We get to cover the fun carnivals that roll through town, meet amazing people and get to be a part of important fundraisers.

Other weeks are hard. Like really hard. When I helped cover the Missing and Murdered Women’s Inquiry when it came into town, I heard stories that will stay with me forever. One woman spoke to the panel about her daughter who was murdered by her abusive boyfriend. She cried out for her daughter and screamed in unimaginable pain. I went home that night and hugged my baby daughter and wept. You don’t get immune to reporting on events like that. And I don’t feel like you should. I heard story after story during that inquiry of people losing loved ones and losing hope that the inquiry will ever make a difference. I can only hope that some day it will, or that something will change so parents can stop walking up and down the Highway of Tears looking for their daughters in ditches.

Most people get into journalism to try and make the world a better place, even just for one person, or even just for one day. We certainly don’t do it for the pay or the glory, because there isn’t much of either of those. When Frances Brown went missing last fall in the Kitseguecla Road area while mushroom picking, I knew I wanted to help. I knew someone that had gone missing when I was younger and this hit close to home. There were so many similarities. As much as we at the paper tried to spread the word and how hard the searchers looked for her, Brown still hasn’t been found.

Not everything ends in disappointment and some people get their happy ending — just like David Hjerto’s quest to find his biological family in Smithers. And I got reminded why we do our jobs. I couldn’t ask for a better (temporary) ending to my time at The Interior News.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Thornhill’s future takes centre stage at June 2 public hearing

The current community plan was adopted in 1981

Class will look different at Coast Mountain College this September

The college is embracing a distributed learning model

City council considers easing food truck restriction

Food trucks limited to four hours public parking, may increase to six hours

VIDEO: Injured bald eagle rescued in B.C. First Nations community

Bird suspected injured in fight, whisked off to Coquitlam rehab

Facing changes together: your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

Toronto Raptors’ Ujiri says conversations about racism can no longer be avoided

Thousands have protested Floyd’s death and repeated police killings of black men across the United States

‘I’m afraid’: Witnesses of wolf attack on senior near Prince Rupert worried about safety

Frank Russ shows where the unprovoked wolf attacked his father

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

Protesters prepare to rally against racism in front of Vancouver Art Gallery

Rally is in response to the deaths of black Americans and a Toronto woman

Protesters rally against anti-black, Indigenous racism in Toronto

Police estimated the crowd to be between 3,500 and 4,000 and said there was no violence

Feds earmark $1.5M to support recovery of B.C., Indigenous tourism

B.C. money will be split between Vancouver Island and Indigenous tourism

Most Read