VIDEO: Would-be drivers caught cheating on ICBC licence test

Most people caught on the surveillance footage were using smartphones to cheat

Cheating on a test at school is bad, but cheating on a test that gets you behind the wheel of a two-tonne vehicle is something else.

That doesn’t stop people from trying on their written driver’s licence tests, ICBC says.

The insurance corporation has released four videos showing four cases of cheating at driving service centres in the Lower Mainland, including two instances by the same woman.

ICBC spokesperson Joanna Linsangan said the hope is that aspiring drivers are encouraged to put in the time to study, read the manual, and take the online practice test.

“If there is one test you wouldn’t want to cheat on, it’s this one, because the consequences of cheating on this one are far greater than a math test,” she said.

“You not knowing the rules of the road could land you [or someone else] in the hospital with a broken bone.”

Most of the cheating caught on the surveillance footage involves smartphones. In one case, a woman can be seen first using her phone to look at saved photos of practice test answers. In another instance, the same woman is seen taking photos of the driver’s test, possibly for a friend.

READ MORE: Man caught on camera allegedly trying to defraud ICBC

READ MORE: ICBC expecting $1.18 billion annual loss as new injury caps take effect

A man is seen using what appears to be an answer key from a previous test.

Answer keys or saved photos won’t offer much help, Linsangan said, even if the person doesn’t get caught. The system that runs the test uses several tools to combat cheating.

First, there’s a large bank of questions to choose from. The order of questions selected and sequence of multiple choice options are also reordered with every new test.

The driving centres also use facial recognition, making it nearly impossible for someone to have another person stand in for them to take their test.

Fortunately, Linsangan said cheating doesn’t happen very often, and ICBC undergoes regular internal audits that include checking surveillance footage at each driving centre.

Roughly 300,000 crashes are reported each year in B.C. With crash rates increasing steadily over the past five years, she said the training is more important than ever.

“What we really want to stress is it’s absolutely imperative to have this knowledge.”


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Northwest mobile unit to help those at heart of mental health, addiction crisis

Province, Northern Health unveils new unit in Terrace to bridge gaps in services

New Mills Memorial project said to be on track

But Skeena MLA Ellis Ross not convinced

Bail hearing adjourned for April in Terrace manslaughter case

Veronica Leanne Bolton, 34, is accused in death of Rene Fagan, 85

Terrace Adult Hockey League raises $7,300 in memory of Curtis Billey

The money fundraised will be used towards a bursary in his name

City looks for consultant to develop marketing strategy for Industrial Park

Opportunities for development available, city says

VIDEO: Restaurant robots are already in Canada

Robo Sushi in Toronto has waist-high robots that guide patrons to empty seats

Permit rejected to bring two cheetahs to B.C.

Earl Pfeifer owns two cheetahs, one of which escaped in December 2015

Real-life tsunami threat in Port Alberni prompts evacuation updates

UBC study says some people didn’t recognize the emergency signal

Care providers call for B.C. seniors’ watchdog to step down

The association also asks the province to conduct an audit and review of the mandate of her office

Sulphur dioxide level peaks in Kitimat

Levels rise to over 60 parts per billion

Nitro Cold Brew Coffee from B.C. roaster recalled due to botulism scare

“If you purchased N7 Nitro Cold Brew Coffee from Cherry Hill … do not drink it.”

B.C. man gets award for thwarting theft, sexual assault – all in 10 minutes

Karl Dey helped the VPD take down a violent sex offender

Nowhere to grieve: How homeless people deal with loss during the opioid crisis

Abbotsford homeless advocate says grief has distinct challenges for those living on the streets

ICBC shifts to Alberta model, with higher rates, private insurers say

B.C. public insurance includes funding enforcement, driver licensing

Most Read