Treaty society says it is unfairly targetted

Treaty society says Enbridge deal is with hereditary chiefs

  • Dec. 22, 2011 6:00 a.m.

The Gitxsan Treaty Society, which have their office based in the Village of Hazelton, are saying they are being unfairly targeted by protesters after a controversial decision by some hereditary chiefs to sign an equity deal to benefit from Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline project.

Under the banner of the Aboriginal Economics Benefits Package, the hereditary chiefs, represented by Chief Elmer Derrick, signed a document on Dec. 5 which gives them a potential $7 million under Enbridge’s proposed $5.5 billion pipeline plan to transport oil from Alberta to a marine export terminal at Kitimat.

The society, which was incorporated to support the Gitxsan nation in treaty and other negotiations, has been boarded up and blockaded by protestors since the announcement was made.

A Supreme Court of BC injunction was issued to prevent the society’s office building, located in the Village of Hazelton, from being restricted but the injunction left the discretion up to RCMP who have so far decided not to get involved.

The society issued a press release on Dec. 16 trying to clarify their involvement with the equity agreement.

In it, they said that they were not a participant in the negotiations nor a signatory to the agreement.

“The negotiation with Enbridge leading to this agreement was an initiative of the Gitxsan Hereditary Chiefs who participated in the Protocol Agreement with Enbridge in 2009,” the society said in the release.

Chief Elmer Derrick signed the agreement on behalf of the other hereditary chiefs, the release said. While Derrick is an employee of the Gitxsan Treaty Society as the chief negotiator, he was not acting in that capacity in regards to this agreement, the society said.

The society is hoping that all of the protesters will respect the BC Supreme Court injunction and allow people to return to the office.

Meanwhile, 90 per cent of those who took part in an online poll say they are against a deal with Enbridge and 100 per cent are opposed to the Northern Gateway pipeline project.

The Gitxsan deal is the first of what Enbridge officials have been saying will be a series of economic benefits agreements for aboriginal people along the 1,100 km pipeline route.

It also calls for Enbridge to work with the Gitxsan chiefs on potential renewable power projects in the area.

The pipeline route does not go through Gitxsan traditional territory but Enbridge’s policy is to negotiate benefits agreements with aboriginal groups within 80km of the pipeline route’s right of way.

(With files from The Interior News, Smithers, BC)

 

 

Just Posted

The Independent Investigations Office of BC has concluded police acted appropriately in the lead-up to a fatal ATV crash north of Terrace on May 23, 2021. (Black Press Media File Photo)
Police watchdog finds no police wrongdoing in fatal ATV crash

The May 23 crash resulted in the death of a Terrace woman

Terrace council chose not to reverse a decision made last fall to allow PCL Construction to work on the new Mills Memorial Hospital project on Sundays. (Illustration courtesy the Northern Health Authority)
City of Terrace upholds Sunday construction at new hospital site

Residents say they wanted one day a week of quiet

(Submitted Photo)
Skeena Voices| Dance, discipline and determination

When Braya Kluss is not dancing, she is a regular 16-year-old teenager… Continue reading

Karl Meyer was an active member of the Thornhill Volunteer Fire Department. (Terrace Professional Firefighters/ Facebook)
VIDEO: First responders parade through town in honour of fallen Thornhill firefighter

Thornhill Volunteer Fire Department’s Karl Meyer was found deceased during June 3 flooding

The border crossing on Highway 11 in Abbotsford heading south (file)
VIDEO: Western premiers call for clarity, timelines on international travel, reopening rules

Trudeau has called Thursday meeting, premiers say they expect to leave that meeting with a plan

St. Joseph's Mission site is located about six kilometres from Williams Lake First Nation. (Photo submitted)
Williams Lake First Nation to search residential school site for unmarked graves

St. Joseph’s Mission Indian Residential School operated from 1886 to 1981

Tuesday’s Lotto Max draw went unclaimed. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Tuesday’s Lotto Max draw went unclaimed. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lotto Max jackpot goes unclaimed again

42 of the 64 Maxmillion prizes of $1 million were won, the majority were sold in Ontario

FILE - This July 6, 2017 file photo shows prescription drugs in a glass flask at the state crime lab in Taylorsville, Utah. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
Contaminants in generic drugs may cause long-term harm to DNA: B.C. researcher

Scientist says findings suggest high volume overseas facilities require strict regulation

Restaurant patrons enjoy the weather on a patio in Vancouver, B.C., on April 5, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Labour shortages, closed borders major obstacles to B.C. restaurant, tourism restarts

Industry expert says it won’t start to recover until international travellers can visit

(Black Press Media file)
Dirty money: Canadian currency the most germ-filled in the world, survey suggests

Canadian plastic currency was found to contain 209 bacterial cultures

(pixabay file shot)
B.C. ombudsperson labels youth confinement in jail ‘unsafe,’ calls for changes

Review states a maximum of 22 hours for youth, aged 12 from to 17, to be placed in solitary

Eleonore Alamillo-Laberge, 6, reads a book in Ottawa on Monday, June 12, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Parents will need to fight ‘COVID learning slump’ over summer: B.C. literacy experts

Parents who play an active role in educating their children this summer can reverse the slump by nearly 80%, says Janet Mort

Most Read