Terrace recorded 26 new COVID-19 cases between Dec. 5 to Dec. 11, 2021. (British Columbia Centre for Disease Control)

Terrace recorded 26 new COVID-19 cases between Dec. 5 to Dec. 11, 2021. (British Columbia Centre for Disease Control)

Terrace sees drop in new COVID-19 cases

No new cases in the Nass Valley for the third straight week

There were no new COVID-19 cases in the Nisga’a local health area (LHA) for the third straight week, while Terrace saw a significant drop.

Terrace recorded 26 new cases between Dec. 5 to Dec. 11, a decrease from 56 new cases the week before.

Kitimat had eight, and there were also eight in Prince Rupert, according to British Columbia Centre for Disease Control (BCCDC) data.

Meanwhile, Smithers saw seven new cases. There were zero new cases on Haida Gwaii and in the Nisga’a LHA for the second week in a row. There was one new case in the Snow Country – Stikine – Telegraph Creek LHA.

The BCCDC figures for cases in the Nass Valley may differ from the Nisga’a Valley Health Authority’s (NVHA) statistics because of differences in the way those organizations report cases.

Kitimat remains the most vaccinated LHA in the northwest, with 96 per cent of people 12 years-old and up with two doses of COVID-19 vaccine. The Dec. 14 two-dose list below has the per cent change from the previous week in brackets:

Kitimat – 96 per cent (+0)

Nisga’a – 88 per cent (+0)

Haida Gwaii – 86 per cent (+0)

Prince Rupert – 85 per cent (+0)

Snow Country – Stikine – Telegraph Creek – 83 per cent (+0)

Terrace – 83 per cent (+1)

Upper Skeena – 80 per cent (+1)

Smithers – 76 per cent (+0)

Health Minister Adrian Dix urged British Columbians to heed newly announced federal travel advice as the Omicron variant continues to spread rapidly across the world.

Dix’s comments on Wednesday (Dec. 15) afternoon come several hours after federal officials announced a new non-essential travel advisory against international trips over the holiday season due to the Omicron variant. As of Dec. 14, B.C. had reported a total of 44 cases of the new variant.

Early analysis of the new variant indicates that it is highly transmissible but may cause less severe disease and that it can be slowed — but not stopped — by today’s vaccines.

With files from Katya Slepian and the Associated Press