Postal workers are out on the streets in Terrace to strike against unfair work contracts. (Natalia Balcerzak/Photo)

UPDATE: Rotating postal strike lifted in Terrace

Workers walked out across the Northwest at 7 a.m.

Terrace postal workers temporarily walked off the job last week. The action began 7 a.m. Nov. 9 and was lifted within 72 hours.

Rotating Canada Post strikes also occured in Kitimat, Smithers and Prince Rupert.

At the onset of the strike a spokesperson from the union couldn’t say how long the action would last, but noted they typically endure for 24 to 96 hours.

“A call will be made by the national executive when people go back in,” he said. “We’re usually pretty good at posting on social media and our website so folks know people are back to work.”

Members of the Canadian Union of Postal Workers have taken turns being at the picket lines across the country since Oct. 22, as mediated negotiations with the Crown corporation drag on.

Donna Bussiere, president of CUPW Local 836, says that being a postal worker is a public service job and although many enjoy the career, it’s taking a toll on them.

“We may be part of a big corporation, but we really are the little guys that just want to come to work — we want a quality of life.”

Bussiere worked as a mail carrier for 25 years, but due to injuries sustained from prolonged, repetitive action was forced into a desk job at the local office. She adds the public has shown support to the striking workers.

“They understand, especially in the smaller communities, the importance of having us here… they see us haul their parcels to their porch.”

The possibility of a work stoppage has hovered over Canada Post since Sept. 26 after postal workers voted overwhelmingly in late summer in support of a potential walkout to back their contract demands. The union is pushing for improved job security, an end to forced overtime, and better health and safety measures.

Canada Post is the biggest parcel shipping company in the country, having delivered about one million parcels per day during the holiday season last year – an increase of 20 per cent over the same period in 2016.

-with files from Canadian Press

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