The mine is expected to have a six-year lifespan and provide approximately 200 jobs, with a year-round production rate of 1,000 tonnes of ore per day. (IDM Mining Photo)

Red Mountain Project given environmental approval

120 conditions from Nisga’a Nation must be followed

The environmental assessment of the proposed Red Mountain Underground Gold Project near Stewart has received the federal government’s approval.

The Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Catherine McKenna, announced in a written press statement on Jan. 14 that the project, which is also subject to requirements under the Nisga’a Final Agreement, is not likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects as it must adhere to more than 120 conditions aimed to minimize or eliminate any damage.

“The Government of Canada is committed to conducting environmental assessments that ensure the protection of our environment, foster economic growth and create good middle-class jobs,” said McKenna in the press release.

“We are confident that with the mitigation measures in place and the legally-binding conditions the proponent must fulfill, this project will move forward in a way that supports sustainable development.”

READ MORE: Skeena Sawmills audit good overall, but fault found in tree planting

The Red Mountain Project, owned by IDM Mining Ltd., is a 17,125-hectare underground gold-silver mine located in the so-called Golden Triangle, approximately 15 km northeast of Stewart, within Nisga’a traditional territory.

A project recommendation and an environmental assessment report have been issued, whereas measures must be taken to protect fish and fish habitat, migratory birds, species at risk, human health, physical and cultural heritage, and the current use of lands and resources for traditional purposes by Indigenous peoples.

In an email, Karen Fish, a spokesperson from the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency told the Terrace Standard, that the Nisga’a Final Agreement pertaining to the Nass Area and Nass Wildlife Area were featured prominently in discussions leading up to the environmental approval.

“The Agency consulted with Nisga’a Nation throughout the environmental assessment. The Minister’s Decision Statement requires the proponent to consult with Nisga’a Nation in the development and implementation of mitigation measures, follow-up programs, and annual reports.”

Eva Clayton, President of the Nisga’a Lisims Government (NLG), said in an email that they worked very closely with IDM Mining Ltd. and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) on the assessment of the project under Chapter 10 of the Nisga’a Final Agreement. She added that the conditions are a result of this close collaboration and that the agreements were in respect of the potential impacts on their treaty rights and interests.

“The Nass Area covered by the Treaty is rich with natural resources. NLG is confident that the decision and conditions will provide significant opportunities for our citizens, with strong protection of the land, water and wildlife. NLG looks forward to working with IDM through the remaining regulatory process and into the construction and operation phases of the project,” said Clayton.

The environmental assessment commenced on Nov. 15, 2015, and was officially concluded on Jan. 14, 2019.

READ MORE: Annual bird count reveals more eagle sightings downtown

The mine is expected to have a life of six years and provide approximately 200 jobs, with a year-round production rate of 1,000 tonnes of ore per day. The project will also include the constructions of a temporary waste rock storage area, water management structures, access and haul roads, and a powerline.

The estimated capital cost is $135 million. It will take about 18 months to build the mine and bring it into production.

The province issued an Environmental Assessment Certificate for the project to IDM Mining on Oct. 15, 2018, under the BC Environmental Assessment Act.

This recent announcement will now allow the company to proceed to their regulatory phase.


 


natalia@terracestandard.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Terrace hosts Taekwondo provincials for first time

Athletes from across B.C. competed at the Sportsplex

Budget 2019: Here’s how the City of Terrace is spending your money

City moves step closer to finalizing budget with new projects, increases

Gas prices spike in northern B.C. ahead of the long weekend

Fuel went up 17 cents overnight in Prince Rupert

No one hurt in house fire in Terrace

Neighbours say they smelled smoke coming from basement unit

Terrace RCMP locate body of missing man in Thornhill

Death is not considered suspicious

4 victims killed in Penticton shooting spree remembered at vigil

John Brittain, 68, is charged with three counts of first-degree murder and one count of second-degree murder

Three climbers presumed dead after avalanche in Banff National Park

One of the men is American and the other two are from Europe, according to officials

TSB issues two safety recommendations in probe of fatal B.C. train derailment

The train derailment killed three crew members on board

VIDEO: Trump tried to seize control of Mueller probe, report says

Special counsel Robert Mueller’s report revealed to a waiting nation Thursday

Short-circuit likely caused Notre Dame fire: police official

Investigators made an initial assessment of the cathedral but can’t yet search charred interior

Whitecaps fans stage walkout over club’s response to allegations against B.C. coach

Soccer coach has been suspended by Coastal FC since February

BC Ferries to pilot selling beer and wine on select sailings

Drinks from select B.C. breweries and VQA wineries will be available on the Swartz Bay to Tsawwassen route

Elizabeth May’s B.C. wedding will be a ‘low carbon affair’ on Earth Day

Green party leader’s wedding party to depart in a cavalcade of electric cars

B.C. awaits Kenney’s ‘turn off taps,’ threat; Quebec rejects Alberta pipelines

B.C. Premier John Horgan said he spoke with Kenney Wednesday and the tone was cordial

Most Read