Physician recruiter Olga Kaliadina was in Newfoundland last week to continue her work recruiting doctors to the northwest. (Brittany Gervais photo)

Recruiter strives to find docs for Terrace

Site visits and family’s buy-in crucial to recruiting success

Olga Kaliadina was on the east coast last week in pursuit of a prize catch – physicians willing to live and work in Terrace.

As the Northern Health Authority’s Terrace-based physician recruiter for the northwest, Kaliadina went to St. John’s, Newfoundland attending the annual conference of the Society of Rural Physicians of Canada.

At the very least, Kaliadina was looking for physicians willing to make a site visit to the city and area so she and others can emphasize the area’s attractions.

“Terrace has a lot to offer,” notes Kaliadina of the attractions. “There’s affordability of life, skiing, hiking, swimming.”

On the medical side, an eventual new Mills Memorial Hospital was emphasized as well as the local number of resident and visiting specialists which now number more than 20 in total.

Past recruiting campaigns have shown that most site visits turn out positive, with a catch rate of 80 per cent, she added.

Kaliadina is quick to add that recruiting nowadays doesn’t just focus on a physician, the physician’s family also has to be sold on Terrace and area.

So while tours of the hospital and other medical facilities and meeting with the local medical community is important, the area’s schools and recreational and cultural amenities are also key.

For a physician’s spouse it can also mean the prospect of finding employment in his or her field.

“It’s not just recruitment. It’s retention as well. We want them to stay in the community,” said Kaliadina of assembling a complete package that will appeal to a physician and his or her family.

Putting together a comprehensive site visit and arranging the site visit itself is often outside of Northern Health’s own resources.

Kaliadina said that while there’s money to pay for airfare of a physician, travel expenses for a spouse and children are not covered.

Providing child care must be considered as well as the costs of sightseeing via helicopter or jet boat for example.

It’s why Kaliadina and Dr. Jaco Fourie, Northern Health’s northwest medical director, gathered local elected and health care officials here Sunday to discuss establishing a community-supported recruitment and retention campaign with a local budget to finance site visits and other costs.

If not attending various physician conferences, such as events in Nanaimo, Toronto, Vancouver, where she plans to go this year, Kaliadina is in email and phone contact with physicians.

“The first contact is an email and that’s followed up with a phone call. What does the community look like? What are the physicians looking for? What are their interests?” Kaliadina said. “We’re looking for a good fit.”

As much as selling the city and area is important, just as crucial is checking a physician’s references, licences and certifications.

That can take some time, said Kaliadina of the need to ensure a physician willing to move to Terrace meets required standards.

Aside from working to attract physicians already working in the country, there are now specific pathways to attract Canadians trained out of the country who wish to move back and for non-citizens trained in their own countries who are considering a move to Canada.

Canadians trained elsewhere who wish to return to the country can achieve Canadian certification after a process which culminates in a two-year residency program while non-Canadians can achieve Canadian certification after a number of benchmarks ending in a three-year commitment to work in an underserved community.

Just Posted

Community cleanup in full swing this weekend

The 2018 Terrace garbathon invites volunteers to help spring clean this Sunday

Terrace Peaks gymnast earns provincial gold on beam

Savannah Medeiros shone brightly in her best division at the BC Artistic Gymnastics Championships

Salmon fishery top of mind as Cullen returns to Parliament

Skeena Bulkley Valley MP says he’ll push for earliest release of DFO plan

Radio host starts 30-hour campout to raise money, awareness for Relay for Life

CJFW’s Mike Nagle will be on top of the catwalk by the Bell Media building until 6 p.m. on Saturday

Terrace library supports B.C. task force

Increased funding would better serve rural communities like Terrace : Tremblay

VIDEO: Moose found licking salt off B.C. man’s pickup truck

Tab Baker was in his garage in Prince George when the small moose gave his truck a clean

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

B.C. student makes short-list for autism advocacy award

Brody Butts honoured for his role as a mentor and self-advocate

Austin Powers ‘Mini-Me’, Verne Troyer, dies at 49

Facebook page confirmed his death Saturday afternoon

Alberta man dead after snowmobile collision on B.C. mountain

The incident occurred on Boulder Mountain Friday morning

B.C. parents grieving teen’s overdose death say it started with opioid prescription

Elliot Eurchuk, 16, died at his Oak Bay home Friday, after taking street drugs

16 of 20 fastest improving B.C. schools are public: Fraser Institute

Independent elementary schools remain at top of the chart in think tank’s annual report card

NAFTA: Talks continue through weekend in scramble to get a deal

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland called negotiations ‘perpetual’

Pulp mill fined $900,000 for leaking effluent into B.C. lake

Mackenzie Pulp Mill pleaded guilty to depositing deleterious substance into water frequented by fish

Most Read