Jeff Mohr

Quads need licence plates starting Nov. 1

Licence for off-road vehicles including dirt bikes and snowmobiles costs $48, penalties for reckless use also going up

The B.C. government is making licence plates mandatory for quads, dirt bikes and other off-road vehicles starting Nov. 1, requiring helmets and restricting use by children under 16.

The B.C. legislation imposes a $230 fine for driving an unlicensed off-road vehicle, and a $368 fine for careless operation. For some offences under the Off-Road Vehicle Act related to reckless use or environmental damage, penalties can go as high as a $5,000 fine and six months in jail.

Forests Minister Steve Thomson said the $48 licence fee applies only once when a vehicle is purchased, and was set to recover the costs of the program administered by ICBC. Once startup costs are paid for, a portion of the licence revenue will go to off-road clubs to use for trail improvements, Thomson said.

The province estimates there are 200,000 off-road vehicles that require licensing, including snowmobiles that have been licensed since the 1970s. About 35,000 of those have registered voluntarily since the new licences were offered a year ago.

Jeff Mohr, past president of the Quad Riders Association of B.C., said his members are most of the voluntary registrants so far, and they are pleased B.C. has a system to control the few users who ride recklessly or damage the environment.

“We want to get more people out on the trails, sharing and enjoying the outdoors,” Mohr said.

The licence system also allows police to track stolen vehicles, even if they are taken out of the province. B.C. is the last Canadian province to implement a licensing system.

The Quad Riders and B.C.’s 72 snowmobile clubs are prepared to publicize the new regulations to their members, and Thomson said they will act as “eyes and ears” for conservation and natural resource enforcement officers.

 

Just Posted

Salmon, oolichan given new life in Terrace art exhibit

Local artist pays homage to fish using old Japanese fish printing technique

Grim situation in coming year for northwest, B.C. fisheries

Annual post-season review in Prince Rupert informs DFO on how to manage 2019 fishing season

Sports Briefs

Your top athletes and teams

VIDEO: Dog behaviourist holds classes to raise funds for NARA

Holidays are a busy time for rescue agencies

Salmon, oolichan given new life in Terrace art exhibit

Local artist pays homage to fish using old Japanese fish printing technique

B.C. billionaires worth 5,845 times average middle-income household

Economists argue for changes to Canadian tax system benefitting rich

Condominium market still ‘a lot better’ than normal in Vancouver suburbs

The Fraser Valley, east of Metro Vancouver, has long been considered a more affordable haven for first-time homebuyers.

Retired B.C. teacher a YouTube Sudoku sensation

A retired Kelowna teacher has amassed quite the following online by teaching the art of solving a Sudoku puzzle.

UN chief returns as climate talks teeter closer to collapse

Predictions from international climate expert, warn that global warming is set to do irreversible environmental damage.

Trump’s willingness to intervene in Meng detention roils Canada’s justification

The International Crisis Group said Tuesday, Dec. 11 it’s aware of reports that its North East Asia senior adviser Michael Kovrig has been detained.

Scientist awarded $100K for work on Arctic contaminants that led to ban

Derek Muir has received the $100,000 Weston Family Prize for his research that showed those carcinogens were able to move into the Arctic.

Manhunt continues for France shooter

Suspected gunman named, had long police record

‘Jurassic Park,’ ‘Shining’ added to National Film Registry

“These cinematic treasures must be protected because they document our history, culture, hopes and dreams.”

Most Read