The image of a five-year-old Iowa boy who died of cancer last year were used for a fake fundraising campaign.

The image of a five-year-old Iowa boy who died of cancer last year were used for a fake fundraising campaign.

Scam using photos of sick U.S. child targets B.C. residents

Someone going by the name of “Bob Dino” claimed to be raising money for the funeral expenses of a child named Dakota

A local non-profit says it knows the identity of an alleged fraudster who used photos of a child from Iowa to launch a fake fundraising campaign targeting Campbell River residents on social media.

Someone going by the name of “Bob Dino” claimed to be raising money for the funeral expenses of a child named Dakota.

But the Cameryn’s Cause for Kids Society – a local group that provides financial assistance to families in crisis situations including the death of a child – said in a Jan. 4 statement that the user “is a fraud and is using a stolen photo of another child from the Internet.”

The user claimed that Cameryn’s Cause was supporting the campaign, but that statement was patently false, according to the non-profit society.

“We take fraud seriously and are disgusted that someone would attach our name to their scam,” the statement said. “We have a screening process that we follow for each applicant.”

In an update on Jan. 6, Cameryn’s Cause said the person behind the campaign is known to the group and to police, and that she goes by several names online.

READ MORE: Warrant issued for young woman facing 115 charges

“We cannot release her name but will say that she is a Campbell River resident who operates on social media under several aliases,” the statement said.

The Campbell River RCMP didn’t immediately reply to a request for comment on Monday, but Cameryn’s Cause said that it had provided information about the local resident to police.

Cameryn’s Cause said it also contacted police in Iowa, because the campaign also used photos of a now-deceased child from that state for the campaign. The group thanked members of the public for raising the issue and providing information “to let us know who this person is.”

By using Google’s reverse image search function, the Mirror has confirmed that the child is Garrett Matthias, a boy from Van Meter, Iowa, who died of cancer in July 2018.

Matthias’ case was widely reported by American media after his parents wrote a unique obituary based on the five-year-old child’s comments during his sickness, including “See ya later, suckas!” A GoFundMe set up to cover his medical expenses and other costs raised more than $71,000.

READ MORE: Man caught on camera allegedly trying to defraud ICBC

Compared to the original, the new and apparently fake campaign was a flop. GoFundMe told the Mirror in a Jan. 7 email that “no funds were raised and the campaign was removed by the campaign organizer.”

Caitlin Stanley, a spokesperson for GoFundMe, said that “campaigns with misuse” are “extremely rare and make up less than one-tenth of one per cent of all campaigns.”

The statement indicated that donors receive a refund “in the rare case that GoFundMe, law enforcement or a user finds campaigns are misused.”

Stanley said that donations to GoFundMe campaigns are “collected by our payment processors, held, and then released only to the person named as the beneficiary.”

She said that funds are only released “once we know who you are, who you’re raising the funds for, your relationship to the beneficiary (if there is one), how the funds are being spent, and how the funds are being delivered to the beneficiary (if there is one).”

READ MORE: Fundraiser launched for former Campbell River man badly injured in workplace explosion

Campbell River resident Sue Halstead says she and her husband shelled out $20 using a Facebook donation page (which has since been deleted) after seeing the appeal for funds on her husband’s news feed.

She sent an instant message to “Bob Dino,” asking whether the child was a twin, as indicated by a photo, and the Facebook user said yes.

Halstead told the user that GoFundMe might be more effective than Facebook for fundraising.

“The next thing I know, (the user) sends me back a GoFundMe page that’s been started,” she said.

The user then shared it on Campbell River Rant, Rave and Randomness, a popular Facebook forum (that post has also been deleted).

Halstead said she was relieved to know the story about the death of a local child wasn’t true when she saw the statement from Cameryn’s Cause.

But she was also appalled that someone would use real photos of a child dying of cancer to tug on people’s heartstrings.

“I was just disgusted that somebody would do that,” she said.

“(They) didn’t raise a lot of money,” she added. “But for some people $20 is a lot of money, and I think somebody donated $50.”

Halstead said the experience wouldn’t prevent her from supporting other causes, but said she hopes to learn more about how to avoid being taken in by online scams.

“You can’t stop trying to help people because of something like this,” she said.

How to avoid scams

Downloading a picture from a campaign website and running it through Google’s reverse image search can help determine whether the image has been poached from someone else online.

It’s also a good idea to check whether a trusted news source has been in contact with someone involved in the fundraising effort.

GoFundMe also lists a number of guidelines on its website for determining the legitimacy of a campaign.

The guidelines state that by reading a campaign page, a potential donor should be able to find out: how the campaign organizer is related to the beneficiary; the purpose of the campaign and how funds will be used; whether direct relatives and friends support the campaign; and whether the recipient is in control of withdrawals, or how the funds will reach them.

”If any of the points above are missing on the campaign, we encourage you to message the organizer by clicking the envelope icon next to their name to ask for more information,” the guidelines state.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

The Majagaleehl Gali Aks Elementary School in Hazelton is being shut down for a week by the Gitanmaax Band Council following a confirmation of a COVID-19 exposure there on Feb. 26. (Black Press Media File Photo)
Hazelton school COVID-19 closure extended one week

With spring break on horizon, Majagaleehl Gali Aks Elementary will be closed to end of March

There were 31 new COVID-19 cases in the Terrace local health area during the week of Feb. 21 to Feb. 27, 2021. (BC Centre for Disease Control)
Northwest B.C. remains a COVID-19 hot spot

There were 31 new cases reported in the Terrace local health area between Feb. 21 and Feb. 27

Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs president and Grand Chief Stweart Phillip speaking at a rally with chiefs from around B.C. outside of the Coastal GasLink pipeline route in 2019. The UBCIC said in an open letter to Terrace city council that it was “heartbroken” to hear about the situation. (Black Press Media File Photo)
Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs ‘heartbroken’ by McCallum-Miller resignation

Terrace’s first Indigenous councillor resigned Feb. 22, alleging systemic racism

Terrace RCMP found gloves containing suspected methamphetamine and purple fentanyl following a traffic stop on the afternoon of March 2, 2021. (Black Press Media File Photo)
Terrace RCMP seize suspected methamphetamine, fentanyl following traffic stop

Police observed passenger of the vehicle trying to hide bags of white substance between their legs

General voting day for the Terrace trustee by-election is Saturday, March 6 at the Terrace Sportsplex Multipurpose Room from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (Black Press file photo)
Terrace trustee by-election: Meet the candidates

General voting day is March 6 at the Terrace Sportsplex Multipurpose Room from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry head for the B.C. legislature press theatre to give a daily update on the COVID-19 pandemic, April 6, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C. nears 300,000 COVID-19 vaccinations, essential workers next

564 new cases, four deaths, no new outbreaks Thursday

Shiromali Krishnaraj arrives from India and receives a mandatory COVID-19 test at Pearson International Airport during the COVID-19 pandemic in Toronto on Monday, Feb. 1, 2021. B.C.’s approved rapid tests also use a nasal swab, with a machine to scan for COVID-19 antibodies. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
B.C.’s rapid COVID-19 tests have produced only two positive results

Tests deployed for exposures in schools, outbreaks in care homes, jails

BC Emergency Health Services confirmed that a call was received just before 10 a.m. Ground paramedics, as well as an air ambulance, are on the way to the area. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)
BREAKING: Helicopter goes down on Bowen Island

Unclear how many passengers aboard and unclear where the helicopter was going

The Nanaimo bar display at the Nanaimo Museum. (City of Nanaimo Instagram)
City of Nanaimo points to correct recipe after New York Times botches batch of bars

City addresses ‘controversy’ around dessert square’s layers

A man holds a picture of Chantel Moore during a healing gathering at the B.C. Legislature in Victoria on June 18, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. First Nation demands transparency in probe into second fatal RCMP shooting

‘Police have killed more Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation members than COVID’

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C. on the COVID-19 situation. (B.C. government)
Dr. Bonnie Henry predicts a ‘post-pandemic world’ for B.C. this summer

‘Extending this second dose provides very high real-world protection to more people, sooner’

The B.C. Supreme Court ruled Feb. 26 that the estate of deceased Sooke man and Hells Angels prospect Michael Widner is to be divided between his wife and his secret spouse. (Black Press Media file photo)
Estate of dead B.C. Hells Angels prospect to be divided between wife, secret spouse

Michael Widner’s 2017 death left a number of unanswered questions

This Dec. 2, 2020 photo provided by Johnson & Johnson shows vials of its Janssen subsidiary’s COVID-19 vaccine in the United States. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Johnson & Johnson via AP
Canada approves Johnson & Johnson’s 1-shot COVID-19 vaccine

It is the 4th vaccine approved in Canada and the 1st that requires just a single dose

Walter Gretzky father of hockey hall-of-famer Wayne Gretzky waves to fans as the Buffalo Sabres play against the Toronto Maple Leafs during third period NHL hockey action in Toronto on Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Walter Gretzky, father of the Great One, dies at 82

Canada’s hockey dad had battled Parkinson’s disease and other health issues

Most Read