A take-home kit to test what’s in your drugs before you take them. (Vancouver Coastal Health photo)

Overdose response team in Vancouver shows promising results

Team gets outside traditional healthcare sites to support people who are hard to reach

A pilot project involving Vancouver firefighters and health care staff launched to stop the cycle of repeated overdoses is showing what officials say are “hopeful early results.”

Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart, city fire Capt. Jonathan Gormick and Vancouver Coastal Health Chief Medical Health Officer Dr. Patricia Daly announced the results of an overdose team pilot project aimed helping those who have had a recent overdose.

Daly says the overdose outreach team delivers services outside traditional health care sites to support people who can be hard to reach.

Overdose patients have been contacted in the days after they’ve been revived, and Vancouver Coastal Health figures show during a recent one-week period, 21 of the 22 patients contacted consented to an introduction to the outreach team.

Team member Chris Dickinson says it can be overwhelming to navigate the health care system for someone who has an opioid use disorder, and they may be unaware of the help they can receive.

Stewart says one of the key recommendations from the emergency overdose task force launched after he became mayor was to find ways to break the cycle of repeated overdoses.

RELATED: Overdose prevention sites, naloxone kits save thousands of lives in B.C., study says

“When a poisoned drug supply traps people in overdose after overdose, they not only lose hope but so do our first responders. This innovative combined overdose response team is helping to break the cycle of overdoses and bring some hope back to everyone fighting this crisis.”

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Stop checks, searches of Wet’suwet’en pipeline opposers unlawful: Watchdog

Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, the B.C. Civil Liberties Association, Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs file complaint

Dozens march for MMIGW at third annual event in Terrace

Family members and friends of victims joined the walk on Feb. 14

Wet’suwet’en pipeline supporters speak up

“Protesters get one side of the story and they stand up with their fists in the air.”

Groups in Terrace receive grants from logging profits

Money comes from the city-owned Terrace Community Forest fund

Regional ringette team off to the BC Winter Games

Players come from Terrace and Houston

Blair says RCMP have met Wet’suwet’en conditions, calls for end to blockades

The Wet’suwet’en’s hereditary chiefs oppose the Coastal GasLink project

Petition seeks to remove local police department from Lindsay Buziak murder case

American woman starts online petition in hopes of helping Buziak family

Health officials confirm sixth COVID-19 case in B.C.

Woman remains in isolation as Fraser Health officials investigate

Study says flu vaccine protected most people during unusual influenza season

Test-negative method was pioneered by the BC Centre for Disease Control in 2004

Saskatchewan and B.C. reach championship round at Scotties

British Columbia’s Corryn Brown locked up the last berth in Pool B

B.C. lawyer, professor look to piloting a mental-health court

In November, Nova Scotia’s mental-health court program marked 10 years of existence

COLUMN: Not an expert on First Nations government structures? Then maybe you should calm down

Consider your knowledge about First Nations governance structures before getting really, really mad

One dead in multi-vehicle collision involving logging truck on northern B.C. highway

DriveBC says highway expected to remain closed until 8 p.m.

B.C. teacher gets 15-year ban after lying about having sex with just-graduated student

Teacher had been dishonest with the B.C. Commissioner for Teacher Regulation

Most Read