Northwest B.C. rock quarry promises more communication

The Kitsumkalum rock quarry has drawn complaints about blasting effects

  • Jul. 30, 2015 12:00 p.m.

COMPLAINTS ABOUT the noise and effects of blasting at the Kitsumkalum First Nation’s rock quarry just west of Terrace have resulted in promises to do more to let people know when the work takes place.

“Experts and workers at the Kalum rock quarry take every measure to mitigate ground vibration and noise. Blasts are controlled and monitored; following proper procedures with an alert whistle sounding before each blast,” indicated a statement from the first nation released today.

“On rare occasions, a shallow blast may reach higher levels of vibration and noise. It’s important to note that the quarry team is monitoring the noise effects of these blasts in our continued efforts to ensure that the community is disturbed as little as possible,” it added.

The quarry has been using email alerts and social media to let people know when blasting is to take place.

“Kitsumkalum First Nation and its Kalum rock quarry operations are committed to continuously reviewing and implementing tools to support public awareness strategies and addressing public concerns,” the statement added.

The quarry, which dates back decades, ramped up in recent years to provide prime client CN with high-quality ballast to serve as a bed for its tracks.

A rail spur constructed from CN’s main line to the quarry several years has improved the flow of material.

In addition, the quarry supplies material for local companies for road beds and cement.

The quarry was recognized last year by a B.C. Aboriginal Business Award.

 

 

 

 

 

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