From left: Northern Women’s Recovery House Society’s board members Annette Rolleman, Valerie Wright and Blane Stensgaard ran the garage sale fundraiser this past weekend. (Contributed Photo)

From left: Northern Women’s Recovery House Society’s board members Annette Rolleman, Valerie Wright and Blane Stensgaard ran the garage sale fundraiser this past weekend. (Contributed Photo)

Northern Women’s Recovery House Society plans to incorporate Indigenous culture into program

First Nations’ practices aimed at helping those in recovery look positively at their roots

The Northern Women’s Recovery House Society is looking to bring in an Indigenous-focused component to their proposed recovery home for women in Terrace.

Society chair Valerie Wright says their aim is to make their program more culturally-aware as they estimate 70 per cent of their occupants may be First Nations. This will be done through discussions in the community, and with the suggestion of an elder on their board.

“The Wellbriety movement encompasses all the cultural teachings…it’s something that’s really important in recovery,” says Wright. “First Nations people had to deal with the residential schools and are still dealing with it, along with the 60s scoop. There’s a lot of pain, trauma and grief…I think it’s important for anybody, regardless of where you come from, to look back.”

The Indigenous-focused piece would incorporate smudging circles and cleansing rituals, amongst other cultural practices, with their program, Wright says. The 12-step recovery treatment includes meditation, yoga, art therapy, anger management, development of life skills and group therapy led by certified addiction counselors.

The proposed recovery house would have between 10 to 12 beds to house women for up to a year as they learn to curb any negative habits and create a new routine for themselves.

READ MORE: New society forms to propose recovery home for women in Terrace

The non-profit society was formed September last year after recognizing the need to provide a safe, sober place for women returning from treatment centres. This would be the first facility of its kind in northern B.C.

Wright says there is a dire need for a recovery home for women in the region, as many struggling with addictions often resort to damp shelters where it can be difficult for them not to relapse while living with people who are intoxicated. Hospitals only accept those in medical distress and not everyone has a welcoming, substance-clean home to return to.

“There are many women that return and they can go to support meetings in the evening, but the most important thing is, where are you living? Are you living with people that are actively drinking or doing drugs?” Wright explains.

“That is extremely difficult and women don’t usually last too long in those situations… depending on how far a person’s gone in their addiction, they might not have had very much structure in their day.”

READ MORE: Terrace comes together on homelessness

Alongside raising awareness of their vision, the society has also worked to seek letters of support, including from the City of Terrace and the Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine, to help them apply for funding to conduct a feasability study.

The detailed assessment is required for them to gain charity status and to establish an official business plan to push their proposed recovery home forward.

“It’s very difficult to get regular funding if you don’t have a feasibility study,” Wright says. “But it’s really wonderful to have all this support and we know most people know that this facility is really needed.”

Although they have applied for grants, Wright says the community has been a great help as they strive to raise money for the proposed recovery home and have raised a total of $1,400 from their garage sale fundraisers. They plan on holding their second annual spaghetti dinner fundraiser next spring and will continue to run their garage sales.


 


natalia@terracestandard.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

General voting day for the Terrace trustee by-election is Saturday, March 6 at the Terrace Sportsplex Multipurpose Room from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (Black Press file photo)
Terrace trustee by-election: Meet the candidates

General voting day is March 6 at the Terrace Sportsplex Multipurpose Room from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Terrace RCMP arrested two men on Feb. 17 after they were told to leave the Sunshine Inn and then became combative with police. (Black Press Media File Photo)
Terrace RCMP arrest men visiting a person in COVID-19 isolation

Men attempted to strike police with a chair, threatened to kill officers when told to leave

The Terrace & District Chamber of Commerce hosted a virtual all candidates forum for the Coast Mountains School District trustee by-election on Feb. 23, 2021. (Screenshot/Terrace & District Chamber of Commerce Facebook)
Terrace trustee candidates lay out top priorites during virual all candidates forum

All candidates forum was held virtually on Feb. 23, 2021

(Phil McLachlan/Capital News)
Murder charge laid in February 2020 stabbing death of Smithers man

Michael Egenolf is charged with the second-degree murder of Brodie Cumiskey

(Phil McLachlan/Capital News)
Murder charge laid in February 2020 stabbing death of Smithers man

Michael Egenolf is charged with the second-degree murder of Brodie Cumiskey

Health Minister Adrian Dix looks on as Dr. Bonnie Henry pauses for a moment as she gives her daily media briefing regarding COVID-19 for British Columbia in Victoria, B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
7 additional deaths and 542 new COVID-19 cases in B.C.

Provincial health officials reported 18 new COVID-19 cases linked to variants of concern

The City of Vancouver estimates there are 3,500 Canada geese in the city right now, and that number is growing. (Bruce Hogarth)
Help tame Vancouver’s Canada goose population by reporting nests: park officials

The city is asking residents to be on the lookout so staff can remove nests or addle eggs

Chief Justice Christopher Hinkson (Office of the Chief Justice)
Judge questions whether B.C.’s top doctor appreciated right to religious freedom

Lawyer for province says Dr. Henry has outlined the reasons for her orders publicly

A sample of guns seized at the Pacific Highway border crossing from the U.S. into B.C. in 2014. Guns smuggled from the U.S. are used in criminal activity, often associated with drug gangs. (Canada Border Service Agency)
B.C. moves to seize vehicles transporting illegal firearms

Bill bans sale of imitation or BB guns to young people

BC Housing minister David Eby is concerned that Penticton council’s decision to close a local homeless shelter will result in a “tent city” similar to this one in Everett, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / Black Press file)
‘Disappointed and baffled’ B.C. housing minister warns of tent city in Penticton

Penticton council’s decision to close a local homeless shelter could create tent city, says David Eby

A recently published study out of UBC has found a link between life satisfaction levels and overall health. (Pixabay)
Satisfied with life? It’s likely you’re healthier for it: UBC study

UBC psychologists have found those more satisfied with their life have a 26% reduced risk of dying

A vial of some of the first 500,000 of the two million AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine doses that Canada has secured through a deal with the Serum Institute of India in partnership with Verity Pharma at a facility in Milton, Ont., on Wednesday, March 3, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Carlos Osorio - POOL
Federal panel recommends 4-month gap between COVID vaccine doses due to limited supply

The recommendation applies to all COVID-19 vaccines currently approved in Canada

A vial of Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine is pictured at a family doctor office, Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 in Paris. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP -Christophe Ena
Trudeau ‘optimistic’ that timeline for rollout of COVID vaccines can be accelerated

Canada set to receive more than 6M COVID-19 vaccine dose than initially expected, by end of March

Beginning late Tuesday, anti-pipeline protesters blocked the intersection of Hastings Street and Clark Drive in Vancouver. (Instagram/Braidedwarriors)
Demonstrators block key access to Vancouver port over jail for pipeline protester

They group is protesting a 90-day jail sentence handed to a fellow anti-pipeline protester

Most Read