(File photo)

Natural gas rates will go up in B.C. on Jan. 1

Regions could pay up to $68 more

Some parts of B.C. could pay as much as $68 more for natural gas next year, according to a statement from FortisBC.

The natural gas utility suffered a setback earlier this fall, when an Enbridge natural gas pipeline ruptured near Prince George and cut off flows on Oct. 9.

The line was out of commission for weeks, before being moved up to 80 per cent capacity in November.

“We strive to deliver natural gas safely and reliably at the lowest reasonable cost,” said Diane Roy, vice-president of regulatory affairs.

“Keeping natural gas rates low for customers is important to us but there has been an impact to our costs associated with actions we had to take to stabilize our natural gas supply following the Enbridge pipeline rupture.”

Residential customers in the Mainland and Vancouver Island service areas will see an annual increase of nine per cent, or $68, based on an average annual usage of 90 gigajoules.

Residential customers in Fort Nelson will see an approximate annual increase of seven per cent or $51 based on an average annual usage of 125 gigajoules.

On the bright side, residential customers in Revelstoke receiving piped propane will see an approximate annual decrease of 11 per cent or $108 based on an average annual usage of 50 gigajoules.

The increases will come into effect on Jan. 1 and are subject to regulatory review by the British Columbia Utilities Commission.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

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