At a cost of more than $15 million, the preferred site for the weigh scale is between Novotny Street and Kirkaldy Street. (Rod Link/Terrace Standard)

Multi-million dollar weigh scale to be built

Slated for Hwy16 in Thornhill

A multi-million dollar state-of-the-art weigh scale complex for commercial vehicles is to be built along Hwy16 in Thornhill.

At a cost of more than $15 million, the preferred site is between Novotny Street and Kirkaldy Street, offline from the highway on the Thornhill Frontage Road.

It’s replacing the former weigh scale location adjacent to the old Hwy16/Hwy37 four-way stop which was removed to make way for the roundabout now being built there.

To date, the federal government has provided $15 million but an additional and still unknown amount will be needed from the province, indicated the provincial highways and infrastructure ministry which is responsible for the project.

“The project is in its early conceptual and development stages. Consultation with Indigenous communities, public and industry will inform the project design and scope, and final budget will be confirmed once this is completed,” indicated a statement from the ministry.

READ MORE: New home found for transportation ministry weigh scales

Early planning calls for a parking lot, scale, indoor and outdoor inspection area and construction of left and right turn lanes from Hwy 16 into and out of the new facility.

The ministry is also forecasting that 300 construction and other jobs will be created over the life of the project.

“Construction would include road and paving lot construction (labourers and equipment operators), building construction (carpenters, concrete mason workers) and electronic and technology works for the scales,” said the ministry.

It’s to feature state-of-the-art technology aimed at easing the time commercial vehicle drivers would otherwise have to spend at the scales.

“The Weigh2GoBC program is a network of weigh-in-motion and automatic vehicle identification technologies which allow commercial vehicles to keep moving while being weighed, helping them to achieve faster, more efficient travel times,” the ministry stated.

“Participating drivers register for the program and carry a transponder on their dash. Vehicles with a registered transponder are inspected for safety by an inspection officer, and given a short term exemption on future stops.”

“Vehicles with a registered transponder communicate with Weigh2GoBC stations upon approach. At a weigh-in-motion equipped station, the vehicle is identified and checked for height, weight and safety credentials while travelling at highway speeds,” the ministry continued.

READ MORE: Expect delays from Terrace roundabout construction

With the new weigh scale in-service date unknown and the former one now gone, officials from the British Columbia Commercial Vehicle Safety and Enforcement agency are using a mobile weigh station that can be used at pullouts.

“This new [mobile] weigh station can be set up in minutes and weigh trucks while they slowly drive over the scale. The flexibility of this new scale allows staff to respond quickly to areas requiring additional oversight,” said the transportation ministry.

Additionally, officers conduct mobile enforcement on highways and side roads, the ministry added.

The $15 million from the federal government money comes from its National Trades Corridors Fund which is billed as a program to improve the performance of the transportation system to increase the value and volume of goods exported from Canada to overseas markets and “to generate new overseas trade as a result of the investment.”

That’s a different program than the federal New Build Canada Fund which four years ago budgeted $17.5 million toward an overpass spanning CN’s tracks which cross Hwy16 west of Terrace toward Prince Rupert.

The province was to add $19.5 million for a total project cost of $37 million but when costs began to climb, the project was shelved.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Provincial COVID-19 data can now be used for B.C. to prepare for a second wave

In the past week, B.C. has seen a slight spike in daily test-positive case counts

Four air ambulance flights out of Terrace delayed or cancelled

Pandemic precautions caused nighttime closure of service station providing weather data to pilots

Skeena Resources, Tahltan prez excited by purchase of Eskay Creek

Skeena gets full control of mine, Barrick gets 12 per cent of Skeena and a one per cent royalty

UPDATE: missing 12-year-old Terrace boy found safe

Was reported missing on Southside around 10 p.m. July 9

Terrace conservation officers relocate Spirit bear

Bear roamed Kitsumkalum Valley north of Terrace for many years

Islanders want BC Ferries to follow order that lets residents board before tourists

For ferry-dependent communities, ferries are often the sole practical lifeline to work, school or medical appointments.

Washington’s NFL team drops ‘Redskins’ name after 87 years

The franchise was given the name back in 1933, when it was still in Boston

Beverly Hills 90210 star’s family selling Vancouver Island Beach Resort

You can own Jason Priestley’s Terrace Beach Resort in Ucluelet for less than $5 million

Genetic detectives begin work to trace spread of COVID-19 in Canada

The kinds of genetic technology being used for this project did not exist when SARS hit Canada in 2003

Sports fishers protest Fraser River Chinook closures

Public Fishery Alliance wants hatchery fish open for harvest

Amber Alert for two Quebec girls cancelled after bodies found

Romy Carpentier, 6, Norah Carpentier, 11, and their father, Martin Carpentier, missing since Wednesday

B.C. man prepares to be first to receive double-hand transplant in Canada

After the surgery, transplant patients face a long recovery

Grocers appear before MPs to explain decision to cut pandemic pay

Executives from three of Canada’s largest grocery chains have defended their decision to end temporary wage increases

Most Read