MP open to LNG site switch meet

Nathan Cullen thinks there’s a deal to be made which could end the opposition to the proposed Lelu Island location west of Terrace, B.C.

Artist’s rendering of the planned Pacific NorthWest LNG plant on Lelu Island near Port Edward.

Skeena-Bulkley Valley NDP MP Nathan Cullen thinks there’s a deal to be made which could end the opposition and controversy surrounding the proposed Lelu Island location for the planned PacificNorthwest LNG project. That change would be for the company to move to another location.

Cullen even has another location in mind – the one on Ridley Island selected by the BG Group for its Prince Rupert LNG project.

“I’ll even buy the coffee,” said Cullen of his offer to host a meeting of top executives from the companies and other decision makers.

Speaking last week, Cullen said the proposal is based on two factors – the first being the opposition to Lelu Island and the second being the recent purchase by Shell of the BG Group.

“I was never sure why they had picked Lelu Island in the first place,” said Cullen in reference to its location within the salmon-sensitive Skeena River estuary.

He added that he has asked Petronas, the Malaysian government-owned corporation which is the lead company involved in Pacific NorthWest LNG, but has failed to get an answer. “I know both the federal and provincial governments wanted them there. Actually, the federal government helped by changing legislation.”

Ever since Lelu Island surfaced as Pacific NorthWest LNG’s preferred location for its LNG plant and export terminal, opposition has grown based on worries of possible effects on Skeena River salmon.

Although a federal environmental review released for public comment last month suggested there would be no effects on salmon populations, opposition to the project remains among some First Nations groups, including the Lax Kw’alaams who have Lelu Island within their traditional territory,  and among environmental groups.

Cullen says that with Shell now buying BG Group, the Prince Rupert LNG project may not proceed simply because Shell is the lead partner in  the LNG Canada project at Kitimat which is significantly further along in the development phase. That would make the Ridley Island location available, he said.

Cullen did caution that any shift in Pacific NorthWest LNG location would require a complete environmental review, and he noted that companies cannot be compelled to undertake massive shifts in project plans.

But those same companies could generate a tremendous amount of goodwill and cooperation from various parties, Cullen added. “If there’s ever a region that needs economic hope, this is it,” said Cullen.

The MP even suggested there might be a role for the federal government to play in any project location change inasmuch as it needs to promote economic development.

He also said anything he might be able to do would acknowledge conversations among the Lax Kwa’alaams and the Metlakatla into locations of prospective LNG projects.

“I would be really cognizant of the process they’re working through,” he said.

Just Posted

PHOTO GALLERY: Malicous Monster Truck Tour

The Malicious Monster Truck Tour sold out to crowds of 2,500 people… Continue reading

CMTN First Nations Fine Arts program offers new advanced diploma

The 10-month program will focus on enhancing jewellery, sculpture and marketing skills

Terrace spawns new salmon art festival

This week’s featured artist: Casey Braam

Back in buisness: former Sears franchisees go it alone

Boota and Diljit Uppal’s new store opens in same location

Terrace minor softball wins big at provincials

U14 team won gold, U16 team nabbed silver in nail-biter finish, U12 placed fourth

Trudeau asks transport minister to tackle Greyhound’s western pullout

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he’s asked Transport Minister Marc Garneau to find solutions in Greyhound Canada’s absence.

Hub for mental health and addictions treatment opens at B.C. hospital

St. Paul’s Hospital HUB is an acute medical unit that includes 10 patient beds

Restaurant Brands International to review policy over poaching employees

One of Canada’s largest fast-food company to review ‘no-poach’ franchise agreements

Calgary family’s vacation ends in tragedy on Texas highway

Three people died and four others were injured in the crash

Union construction cost competitive, B.C. Building Trades say

Non-union firms can bid on infrastructure, but employees have to join international unions

Trudeau to shuffle cabinet ahead of Liberals’ team for 2019

Trudeau could lighten the work loads of cabinet ministers who currently oversee more than one portfolio

Car calls 911 on possible impaired B.C. driver

A luxury car automatically calls Princeton police to scene of crash involving alcohol

BC Games marks 40 years in 2018

Cowichan Games a milestone for BC Games Society

VIDEO: Life’s a beach at this B.C. sand sculpting contest

More than $50,000 was up for grabs at the annual contest held in Parksville

Most Read