Minister of Children and Family Development Katrine Conroy at a child care announcement in Vancouver. (Katya Slepian/Black Press)

More than 1,000 operators opt in to child care savings

More than 25,000 spaces will see fee reductions of up to $350 already

Hundreds of child care providers across B.C. have already applied to reduce fees by up to $350 per child, according to the province.

The savings come as part of a program introduced by the NDP government during February’s budget where licensed child care providers would save between $60-350 per child per month and pass those savings on to the parents.

READ MORE: New spaces a step to universal child care

According to finance minister Carol James, the benefits are intended to encourage unlicensed providers to license.

“Parents want quality child care that is safe and gives them peace of mind while they are at work. For those parents lucky enough to find a spot, they struggle to afford high child care fees,” noted James in February.

READ: B.C. parents to save up to $350 a month on child care in April

More than 25,000 child care spaces have been approved for fee reductions so far and child care providers have applied to reduce fees for more than 39,000 of the 49,000 eligible spaces.

The province said that median infant and toddler care costs in Vancouver have reached $1,250 per month and average around $1,000 per month on south Vancouver Island and the Kootenays, and it’s almost as high in the Okanagan and Interior.

The new fee reductions are:

  • up to $350/month for group infant/toddler care
  • up to $200/month for family infant/toddler care
  • up to $100/month for group care for children aged 3-5
  • up to $60/month for family care for children aged 3-5

The province has compiled a database of all child care providers approved for fee reductions here.


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