Jesse and Sarah Fees have their children along on a trip in North Tacoma, Wash., to restock their kitchen, Sunday, Feb. 10, 2019. (Peter Haley/The News Tribune via AP)

More storms in store for snow-socked Pacific Northwest

A winter storm watch is in effect from Monday morning through Tuesday afternoon

Pacific Northwest residents, more accustomed to rain than snow, found themselves digging out yet again as a fresh round of storms moved over the area, with an additional punch to come early this week.

The sun came out Sunday afternoon, but snow returned in the evening across the Northwest, bringing 1 to 4 new inches (2.5 to 10 centimetres). And another storm bringing snow and the potential for freezing rain was on tap for parts of the Seattle area.

Light snow started to make its way into the interior lowlands in the late afternoon Sunday, the National Weather Service said. It was expected to taper off in time for the Monday morning commute, but the next storm was on its way later in the day. A winter storm watch was in effect from Monday morning through Tuesday afternoon.

READ MORE: Snowstorm buries Pacific Northwest, with more on the way

Storms have delivered more snow to Seattle in the first days of February than it usually gets in a year, The Seattle Times reported .

Temperatures were in the teens or single digits. It was 9 degrees in Arlington, Washington, early Sunday. The weather service said that was colder than the Arctic coast or North Slope of Alaska.

An expected 2 feet to 4 feet (0.6 metre to 1.2 metres) from Sunday through Wednesday in the Cascades could be welcome to skiers and snowboarders, Will Ahue, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Portland, told The Oregonian.

Seattle schools will be closed Monday, along with other area schools.

In Northern California, the latest in a series of storms dusted beaches with snow and caused whiteout conditions on mountain roads. The weather service office in Eureka reported accumulating snow at sea level. KIEM-TV posted photos of Clam Beach in Arcata covered in fresh powder.

The last time Humboldt County beaches saw snow was during the winter of 2002-03, forecasters said.

READ MORE: Much of B.C. seeing snow, -40 C wind chills

The Associated Press

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