Major aquatic centre overhaul wanted by Terrace, B.C. council

City is asking for $4.7 million from the federal government

CITY COUNCIL is asking for $4.7 million for an extensive overhaul of its aquatic centre.

The money, which would come from federal gas taxes, would be used for new drainage systems, accessibility ramps, a new family change room and also a new fitness room to be located beside where the current men’s change room is.

The front service desk would also be moved.

The request would cover complete project expenses and council, in approving the application last night at a regular council meeting,, was told there’s a shelf ready plan to put to use.

If the money comes in the centre would have to shut down for eight months during renovations.

Airport asks for help

Northwest Regional Airport manager Carman Hendry appeared at the city council meeting last night, asking that the city either waive or provide $133,000 in the form of a grant or in-kind donation for its planned $15 million, multi-year renovation and expansion project.

The $133,000 is the cost of development fees the airport would otherwise have to pay the city as it develops its project.

A new check-in area, new queuing area and other improvements are wanted.

Youth rehab centre wanted

Council will be rewriting and submitting a letter to the provincial health ministry to request that a rehabilitation facility for addicted youth be brought back to the northwest.

According to local resident and advocate Adrienne Goodrich who was at council with a group of fellow advocates, the problem of youth addiction to hard drugs is a disproportionally bad problem in the area.

The removal of the Atlas Youth Centre ran by Terrace and District Community Services Society and financed by the province up until 2009 was a terrible blow and Goodrich wants council to again advocate for the return of such a facility.

“Since the closure of Atlas Youth Treatment Centre in 2009 our region has been without a residential addictions treatment for the community’s most precious and vulnerable members,” said Goodrich, adding that the counselling that is available is insufficient.

As it stands, youth are sent to Prince George if they have a problem, even if they are in need of detox.

“Prince George is pretty big. For someone to come from a small community to Prince George, the treatment centre is in the middle of town, there is culture shock and there is a lot for them to overcome to stay on a successful path” she continued.

Councillor Stacey Tyers recommended that the letter ask for a detox centre as a beginning.