Canadian National Railway says petroleum coke spilled into a creek after a 27 cars of a freight train derailed northeast of Prince George Thursday, March 4, 2020. (Jennifer Goold/Facebook)

Liquefied petroleum gas was aboard recently derailed train in northern B.C.: TSB

Jonathan Abecassis of CN Rail says less than a carload of petroleum coke spilled into an adjacent creek

The Transportation Safety Board says seven rail cars that derailed in northern British Columbia last Thursday were filled with liquefied petroleum gas.

Board spokesman Alexandre Fournier says in an email that seven of the 28 derailed cars contained the gas, which is classified by the federal government as a flammable and dangerous commodity.

Fournier and Canadian National Railway say one car was carrying methanol and the other 20 cars were loaded with petroleum coke when they derailed in Giscome, B.C.

Jonathan Abecassis of CN Rail says less than a carload of petroleum coke spilled into an adjacent creek.

He says there was no danger to the public and no fire or injuries.

The local school district says Giscome Elementary was evacuated after the derailment due to uncertainty about the contents of the rail cars.

ALSO READ: Petroleum coke spilled into creek after CN Rail train derailed northeast of Prince George

The school, which is 200 metres from the rail line, remains closed and classes have been moved to a nearby elementary school.

Abecassis says petroleum coke is a non-hazardous byproduct of the refining process. All of the petroleum coke that spilled has been secured, he adds, and silt curtains and skirted booms were used after the derailment.

Fournier says the car carrying methanol derailed but remained upright.

The B.C. government’s environmental incident website says the transfer of liquid petroleum gas from the toppled rail cars began Sunday and is expected to last several days.

Trains are moving past the derailment site and environmental water quality monitoring in the nearby waterway is continuing, it says.

Fournier says the derailment is still being assessed by the Transportation Safety Board, which sent a team to the site.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

CN Rail

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A second wave of COVID-19 is probable, if history tells us anything

B.C.’s top doctor says that what health officials have learned this round will guide response in future

Flooding highly unlikely this year throughout Skeena watershed

Region’s snowpack among lowest in the province

BC Transit focused on making buses safer and more comfortable in Phase Two of BC’s Restart Plan

All Terrace buses will have vinyl barriers to protect drivers by June 1

Student food pack demand soars because of school closure

Starfish program now delivers food to students’ homes

Regional district puts COVID-19 safeguards in place

Meeting today will be by tele-conference

LIVE: Procession to honour Snowbirds Capt. Jennifer Casey comes to Halifax

Snowbirds service member died in a crash in Kamloops one week ago

Facing changes together: your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

RCMP facing ‘systemic sustainability challenges’ due to provincial policing role

Provinces, territories and municipalities pay anywhere from 70 to 90 per cent of the cost of the RCMP’s services

One man dead after standoff with Chilliwack RCMP

The Independent Investigations Office of B.C. is investigating the RCMP’s role in the death

Introducing the West Coast Traveller: A voyage of the mind

Top armchair travel content for Alaska, Yukon, BC, Alberta, Washington, Oregon and California!

B.C. employers worry about safety, cash flow, second wave in COVID-19 restart

A survey found 75 per cent of businesses worry about attracting customers

Ex-BC Greens leader Andrew Weaver says province came close to early election

Disagreement centred on the LNG Canada project in northern B.C.

Canada’s NHL teams offer options to season-ticket holders

Canadian teams are offering refunds, but also are pushing a number of incentives to let them keep the money

B.C. premier says lessons to learn from past racism during response to pandemic

B.C. formally apologized in the legislature chamber in 2008 for its role in the Komagata Maru tragedy

Most Read