Students of ‘Na Aksa Gyilak’yoo School in Kitsumkalum at the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. (Chris Gareau photo)

Kitsumkalum students to be heard across Canada

‘Na Aksa Gyilak’yoo School students told their music video will play at future MMIWG Inquiry hearings

The National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls heard from 27 families at the public hearings in Smithers, plus 12 more in private.

The stories were of loss and hope, injustice and resilience. They weighed heavy on the heart for anyone who sat through the three days inside the Dze L K’ant Friendship Centre.

That’s why it was such a relief to hear from the students of ‘Na Aksa Gyilak’yoo School in Kitsumkalum.

The ‘Na Aksa Gyilak’yoo students, who ranged from Grades 5 to 12, spoke Wednesday after performing two songs including The Highway.

The Highway has a well-produced video created with the help of N’we Jinan, a program aimed at helping students express themselves creatively.

When the kids, who come from communities around the region including Terrace, Kispiox and Kitsumkalum, had the opportunity to speak directly to the commissioners of the inquiry, they didn’t miss the chance to make an impact. Commissioner Michèle Audette asked the students if future inquiry meetings could start with their video, which was answered with an assertive yes by the students.

“You’re representing hope. And I don’t know where you got that strength, but it’s telling me that it’s possible and it’s there and it’s so alive; that you’re keeping our laws alive for today and tomorrow,” Audette told the kids as they sat in front of the cameras and a national audience.

Each student then put their written message in a red willow basket at the front to be shared with the country as part of the inquiry’s report. The ceremonial basket was gifted to the inquiry from a group in Manitoba.

A message of leadership rising up from these youth was also sent.

“My principal Colleen [Austin] and [cultural advisor Larry Derrick], they always tell me don’t let people bring you down because we’re young leaders; we’re the new generation,” said Grade 10 student Linda Spencer.

Just Posted

‘Beauty amongst such tragedy:’ B.C. photographer captures nature’s trifecta

David Luggi’s photo from a beach in Fraser Lake shows Shovel Lake wildfire, Big Dipper and an aurora

Police patrol for looters in evacuated areas south of Burns Lake

RCMP have brought in extra officers for the task

Pool opening further delayed

A deficiency in the tile works has setback its completion, city says

Terrace fire ban now includes Ferry Island

The ban will be in place until further notice

Four Rivers Co-op collecting donations for wildfire relief

The co-op is matching all donations they receive for the Red Cross

Canadians fear for relatives trapped amid flooding in Indian state of Kerala

More than 800,000people have been displaced by floods and landslides

IndyCar driver Wickens flown to hospital after scary crash

IndyCar said Wickens was awake and alert as he was taken to a hospital

Ex-BCTF president ‘undeterred’ after early release from pipeline protest jail term

Susan Lambert and Order of Canada recipient Jean Swanson released early

Fast food chains look to capitalize on vegetarian, vegan trend with new items

Seven per cent of Canadians consider themselves vegetarians and 2.3 per cent identify as vegans

B.C. swimmer halts journey across Strait of Juan de Fuca after hypothermia sets in

Victoria MS athlete Susan Simmons swam for eight-and-a-half hours in 9 C choppy waters

‘Hard on water:’ Smoke not the only long-range effect of wildfires

The project began more than 10 years ago after southern Alberta’s 2003 Lost Creek fire

B.C. VIEWS: Genuine aboriginal rights are misused and discredited

Camp Cloud one of long line of protests falsely asserting title

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to march in Montreal’s Pride parade

Trudeau will end the day in his home riding of Papineau

Most Read