Tahltan Central Government President Chad Norman Day and Nisga’a Lisims Government President Eva Clayton hold up the nation-to-nation alliance memorandum of understanding signed Feb. 22 in Gingolx. It was a reaffirmation of the MOU signed in 2016, but with the significance of being signed on Nisga’a territory during the Tahltan’s first official invite during Hobiyee celebrations.

Historic meeting of Nisga’a and Tahltan strengthen ties during Hobiyee

Lots of video from alliance affirmation meant to boost economies and protect land

In a celebration with about 1,000 people that shook the foundation of the Gingolx Community Centre, Nisga’a and Tahltan leaders signed documents almost as tall as themselves to signify just how massive of a deal their alliance is.

The memorandum of understanding (MOU) was a re-affirmation of a deal signed in May of 2016, but the significance of this signing between the two nations would be hard to understate. This was the first time the Tahltan were officially invited to Nisga’a territory.

The deal is to strengthen economic ties especially, with mining operations like Pretivm’s Brucejack and the planned KSM mine moving into the area.

Tahltan Central Government President Chad Day and Nisga’a Lisims Government President Eva Clayton exchanged gifts and each took a turn at the microphone to talk about why this was such an important occasion.

Day spoke of the chance to combine forces and use each other’s strengths while helping their ally with weaknesses. He stressed the history of Tahltan work in mining over the centuries, pointing to the obsidian around his neck. Day also looked forward to combining forces on culture, perhaps inspired by the incredible performances he saw.

Clayton touted the historical significance, bringing up an original 1898 treaty that started the path to recognized boundaries, peace and cooperation between the nations. She then also looked forward to the training, employment and business for the nations’ contractors in a long-term sustainable economy, while being stewards to the land of B.C.’s northwest.

It was a good time to hold an MOU signing, with Hobiyee celebrations coinciding and a packed building housing up to a thousand chiefs, dancers, singers and revellers.

Hobiyee is the Nisga’a new year. It happens usually in February during the last crescent moon, and gets everyone ready for the return of the oolichan — the first source of food for the new year.

Things kicked off with a huge choreographed performance by the Nisga’a cultural dancers, spreading powerful waves with drums, dancing and singing over the crowd. The Tahltan also took a turn, encouraging people to join in. All this as smells circulated from the kitchen for the upcoming feast, and under the crescent moon suspended from the ceiling.

Earth’s true, first satellite was swinging towards the horizon, getting set to rise and signal a new beginning.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Nisga’a cultural dancers put on a powerful show for their Tahltan visitors Feb. 22 in Gingolx during Hobiyee celebrations. The two governments signed an alliance agreement at the end of the ceremonies. (Chris Gareau photo)

Just Posted

Dead salmon fry found in Terrace stream prompts response from City

Public Works crews are marking storm drains to raise awareness of salmon habitat vulnerability

RCMP bust five impaired drivers in one day in Terrace and Kitimat

Police were doing road checks as part of distracted driving, seatbelt enforcement campaign

Horgan makes campaign stop in Terrace and Kitimat

BC NDP leader met with local First Nations leaders, reiterated campaign promises

Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of Sept. 27 to Oct. 3

World Farm Animals Day, Drink Beer Day and Virus Appreciation Day are all coming up this week

B.C. counts 125 new COVID-19 cases, up to 1,284 active

No new deaths or health care facility outbreaks

Health Canada green-lights rapid COVID-19 test

Health Canada approved the BCube test from Hyris Ltd. in the United Kingdom Sept. 23

FINLAYSON: COVID-related job losses concentrated in urban areas… especially Metro Vancouver

The biggest job losses, in absolute terms, have been in Metro Vancouver

6 puppies rescued in mass seizure on Princeton farm die from illness: BC SPCA

Of the 97 distressed horses, cats and dogs seized, most of the puppies suffered from parvo

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Action demanded over death of First Nations youth in Abbotsford group home

Family and Indigenous organizations push for thorough investigation

U.S. boater fined $1,000 for violation of Quarantine Act

49-year-old man entered Canada to visit girlfriend in Surrey

More sex abuse charges laid against B.C. man who went by ‘Doctor Ray Gaglardi’

Investigators now focussing efforts on alleged victims within the Glad Tidings Church community

B.C. VOTES 2020: Businesses now owe $6 billion in deferred tax payments

COVID-19 relief from remittance to province ends with September

Most Read