Here are the top earners at Coast Mountains School District

Here are the top earners at Coast Mountains School District

Audited financial report released for 2018/2019 fiscal year

Income numbers from Coast Mountains School District 82 were released to the public at the last school district meeting on Nov. 27.

Statement of Financial Information (SOFI) reports are released annually by the government and lists all employees who earn salaries above $75,000 a year, along with their expenses.

The most recent salaries cover the period between July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019.

Superintendent Katherine McIntosh leads the pack in terms of salary after collecting $175,946 during the previous fiscal year. McIntosh, who left her position after being seconded to the Ministry of Education in September, also claimed $29,357 in expenses.

READ MORE: CMSD82 superintendent taking year-long position with Ministry of Education

McIntosh’s expenses were relatively high in comparison to other district directors. Expenses typically cover cell phone bills, registration fees, transportation costs, accommodations, meals and memberships, according to Ray McDonald, secretary treasurer.

“The superintendent is required to attend several more functions, meetings, conferences, in their role as superintendent and as part of the school board, as such this position incurs significantly more expenses related to attending these events than any other employee in the district,” McDonald wrote in an email to the Terrace Standard.

Director of Instruction Janet Meyer, who is now the acting superintendent for the district, claimed $18,997 in expenses last year, followed by Agnes Casgrain, director of Indigenous education, at $16,681.

The following nine staffers round out the 10 highest paid employees based on the SOFI report.

  • Cameron MacKay, director of human resources — $166,177
  • Agnes Casgrain, director of Indigenous education — $142,059
  • Janet Meyer, director of instruction, school support — $142,059 (now acting superintendent)
  • Julia Nieckarz, director of instruction, learner support — $137,285
  • Keith Axelson, principal at Caledonia Senior Secondary School — $135,044
  • Phillip Barron, principal at Skeena Middle School — $131,339
  • Mark Newbery, vice-principal at Skeena Middle School — $131,051 (now principal at Majagaleehl Gali Aks Elementary School)
  • Geraldine Lawlor, Mount Elizabeth Middle/Secondary School principal — $130, 293 (now director of instruction, innovation and graduation)
  • Alanna Cameron, secretary-treasurer — $127, 136

READ MORE: SD82 secretary treasurer resigns

In total, school district staff who earn more than $75,000 a year were paid $21.3 million and claimed $354,563 in expenses.

For context, here were the top five earners for the last fiscal year:

  • Katherine McIntosh, superintendent — $165,441, $29,003 in expenses
  • Alanna Cameron, secretary-treasurer — $149,137, $19,541 in expenses
  • Cameron MacKay, director of human resources — $139,478, $15,152 in expenses
  • Janet Meyer, director of instruction, school support — $131,444, $8,807 in expenses
  • Agnes Casgrain, director of Indigenous education — $131,444, $10,389 in expenses

In total, school district staff who earn more than $75,000 a year were paid $18.5 million and claimed $264,225 in expenses for the 2017/2018 fiscal year.


 


brittany@terracestandard.com

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