Western Commander issued a mayday call at 9:34 a.m. and was listing when the Coast Guard and RCM SAR 64 crews arrived on scene. (RCM SAR 64 photo)

Western Commander issued a mayday call at 9:34 a.m. and was listing when the Coast Guard and RCM SAR 64 crews arrived on scene. (RCM SAR 64 photo)

Fuel spotted where Western Commander sank

The fishing vessel went down on April 9, west of Prince Rupert in Northern B.C.

When the Western Commander sunk on April 9, it was carrying approximately 2,000 litres of diesel on board.

At the time, no pollution was observed. But a day later, the Canadian Coast Guard flew over the area and observed a sheen of fuel cover the water and moving away from land. The substance was approximately 40 metres wide.

The Canadian Coast Guard and BC Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy are now involved in assessing the situation.

“It is anticipated that any future sheen will continue to dissipate and evaporate with wind and tidal action,” Michelle Imbeau, communications advisor for the Canadian Coast Guard, said in an email.

The Western Commander sank approximately 264 feet under water, and cannot be recovered.

READ MORE: Prince Rupert man dies after sinking of the Western Commander



keili.bartlett@thenorthernview.com

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Canadian Coast Guard