The Telus building in Terrace on Aug. 25, 2021. The provincial government has provided Telus with over $3.5-million to improve internet services for the Kitselas First Nation and other Indigenous communities. (Ben Bogstie/Terrace Standard)

The Telus building in Terrace on Aug. 25, 2021. The provincial government has provided Telus with over $3.5-million to improve internet services for the Kitselas First Nation and other Indigenous communities. (Ben Bogstie/Terrace Standard)

Faster, more reliable internet coming to Kitselas First Nation

Telus receiving over $3.5-million from the province for projects in 10 Indigenous communities

Members of Kitselas First Nation should have a smoother experience online later this year.

The provincial government is providing over $3.5-million to Telus as part of its Connecting British Columbia program, for the telecommunications giant to increase internet speeds and reliability in Indigenous communities.

“These projects are an important step in ensuring people in Indigenous communities have the connectivity they need to stay in touch with friends and family, market their businesses online, access more remote education and training and benefit from the convenience of technologies like video conferencing,” said Minister of Citizens’ Services Lisa Beare, in a media release.

The fund administrator for the project is the Northern Development Initiative Trust (NDIT), an economic development funding corporation that is independent from government.

Aside from Kitselas, nine other Indigenous communities are slated to receive improved internet this fall: Ashcroft Indian Band, Upper Nicola Band, Cook’s Ferry First Nation, Shackan Indian Band, Bonaparte First Nation, Saik’uz First Nation, Lheidli T’enneh and Coldwater Indian Band.

READ MORE: COVID-19 highlights lack of connectivity in First Nations communities