Flood waters cover highway 1 in Abbotsford, B.C., Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2021. Canadian consumers should be prepared for higher prices and even shortages of some items this holiday season due to catastrophic flooding in British Columbia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Empty shelves, higher prices expected as B.C. floods disrupt supply chains

Asian goods funnel east through Vancouver, impact will be felt across the country come December

Canadian consumers should be prepared for higher prices and even shortages of some items this holiday season due to catastrophic flooding in British Columbia.

Floods and mudslides have halted rail access and shut down highways in the western province.

Experts say this will have a “brutal” effect on the country’s supply chain. The Port of Vancouver is Canada’s largest port, handling $240-billion in goods annually.

Retail analyst Bruce Winder says the effects will start to show up on store shelves mid-December. Companies without a large and sophisticated supply chain won’t be able to access goods made in Asia.

Grocery stores will also be affected, especially in the West. A lot of Canada’s fresh produce is imported through B.C.

Experts say supply chain disruptions will contribute to food inflation.

—The Canadian Press

RELATED: B.C. storm disrupts supply chain, could have lasting impacts on economy: experts

BC Floodinflation

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