Dumped carcasses found near Terrace

While conservation officers determined a moose and five deer carcasses were not being used as hunting bait, dump still illegal

  • Nov. 7, 2015 11:00 a.m.

Whoever dumped a moose carcass and five deer carcasses at Thunderbird near the power lines could be fined close to $1,000.

“There’s no evidence at the site so right now it would just be public information that would help us,” said Skeena conservation officer Ryan Gordon Nov. 4.

“We’re certainly interested in [hearing from] anyone with information.”

Two people out on an ATV Nov. 1 found moose remains and five deer skins dumped at Thunderbird, as one of the people noted on Facebook.

On their return trip two hours later, they saw a big pile of corn and a bunch of frozen fish had been added, looking like someone was laying down bait so when a bear came by, hunters could kill it, said the post on Facebook.

It was reported to conservation officers, who went out to the site the next day to take a look and take photos.

“It looks like it was a bunch of Queen Charlotte deer so probably they processed it at home and took all the inedible portions and dumped them in that spot along with freezer burned fish,” said Gordon.

“There was no indication of bear baiting. I think it is more of a case of dumping. It’s still an illegal act – they should be taking it to the landfill.”

The reason why it’s illegal is that people walk their dogs along that same area and they could come across a bear there and conflict would ensue, Gordon added.

Gordon didn’t see any bears there but lots of birds had descended on the carcasses.

If the person is caught, the fine for dumping the carcasses is $575 plus the additional fine of $345 for potentially attracting dangerous wildlife, said Gordon.

And the person would have to clean up their mess too.

With birds feeding off the remains, Gordon figured the carcasses would be gone in a couple of days.

Animal parts are dumped in the bush probably half a dozen times a year, even though taking the parts to the dump doesn’t cost anything because it’s considered part of residential waste, said Gordon.

“I’m not sure what the rationale is [for dumping]. They just want to get rid of it or it gets smelly and they just want to get rid of it as quickly as possible,” he said.

He speculates this person went to the Queen Charlottes to hunt deer, shot their five deer, brought them back and cleaned and disposed of them there, along with rotten fish.

Gordon reminds people that if they see someone dumping animal parts or other conservation violations to call the Report All Poachers and Polluters toll-free number at 1-877-952-7277.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Stop checks, searches of Wet’suwet’en pipeline opposers unlawful: Watchdog

Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, the B.C. Civil Liberties Association, Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs file complaint

Dozens march for MMIGW at third annual event in Terrace

Family members and friends of victims joined the walk on Feb. 14

Wet’suwet’en pipeline supporters speak up

“Protesters get one side of the story and they stand up with their fists in the air.”

Groups in Terrace receive grants from logging profits

Money comes from the city-owned Terrace Community Forest fund

Regional ringette team off to the BC Winter Games

Players come from Terrace and Houston

Fashion Fridays: The 8 best quality online stores! Shop the ultimate sales

Kim XO, helps to keep you looking good on Fashion Fridays on the Black Press Media Network

Petition seeks to remove local police department from Lindsay Buziak murder case

American woman starts online petition in hopes of helping Buziak family

Health officials confirm sixth COVID-19 case in B.C.

Woman remains in isolation as Fraser Health officials investigate

Study says flu vaccine protected most people during unusual influenza season

Test-negative method was pioneered by the BC Centre for Disease Control in 2004

Saskatchewan and B.C. reach championship round at Scotties

British Columbia’s Corryn Brown locked up the last berth in Pool B

B.C. lawyer, professor look to piloting a mental-health court

In November, Nova Scotia’s mental-health court program marked 10 years of existence

COLUMN: Not an expert on First Nations government structures? Then maybe you should calm down

Consider your knowledge about First Nations governance structures before getting really, really mad

One dead in multi-vehicle collision involving logging truck on northern B.C. highway

DriveBC says highway expected to remain closed until 8 p.m.

B.C. teacher gets 15-year ban after lying about having sex with just-graduated student

Teacher had been dishonest with the B.C. Commissioner for Teacher Regulation

Most Read