College adds work camp-style dorm rooms for students here

NWCC is filling two needs with a decision to spend $400,000 on work camp-style mobile units for student housing.

Facilities Director Kelly Clarke shows off the new Northwest Community College dorms

Facilities Director Kelly Clarke shows off the new Northwest Community College dorms

NORTHWEST Community College is filling two needs with a decision to spend $400,000 on work camp-style mobile units for student housing, says its facilities director.

The first is that it increases its student housing stock and the second, for trades students who want to live in the units, it gives them a taste of camp life should they ever work away from home, said Kerry Clarke.

“It is very different, a very masculine environment, so we need to train people to understand what to expect when they get there,” he said of camp conditions.

Eight trailers make up the 49 co-ed rooms available and are joined together at the college’s unused ball diamond on the edge of its campus.

There’s a central  trailer with a laundry room, one large men’s washroom and eight individual washrooms.

Clarke says the idea was inspired by a conversation between himself and trades coordinator Kevin Jeffery last year.

They were lamenting the shortage of student housing in Terrace, limiting access to the college where demand often exceeded the 84 dorm rooms available.

Clarke said they knew of students who had been unable to come study and courses that have been canceled because students could not find housing.

Rental accommodations in the city began to tighten several years ago with increased activity due to preliminary work being done for potential liquefied natural gas and other projects.

As they talked, Clarke and Jeffery joked about housing students in the Valard work camp at Kitsumkalum which was being shut down at the time as work ended on BC Hydro’s Northwest Transmission Line.

“That was a lightbulb that went off,” Clarke said. “Then it kind of progressed onwards and then we thought, let’s put a camp on our campus.”

The dorms are made of refurbished trailers, which are seven years old and originally from the Alberta oil patch. Clarke says their life expectancy is 25 years and the $425 monthly room cost is the same as for the other college dorm rooms.

Each has a bed, desk, refrigerator, closet space and drawers, a flat screen television, Wi-Fi access and air conditioning.

Preference is being given, but not limited, to trades students.

The purchase and set up cost was $400,000 with $375,000 coming from the provincial advanced education ministry and $25,000 from the college.

Students in the new camp will be on the regular college food plan, will have access to covered barbecues, and can have microwaves in their rooms if they choose.

Clarke says the increased student capacity does not require changes to the college’s cafeteria service.

There’s been other work going on as well at the college, chiefly renovations to its cafeteria and also to the registration area in the college’s main building.

 

Just Posted

Suspected methamphetamine and scale seized by police. (Terrace RCMP photo)
Terrace RCMP seize guns, ammo, suspected narcotics

Man released after court appearance

Caledonia Secondary School is the recipient of a $50,000 grant to replace its aging science equipment. (File photo)
Cal snags major grant to modernize science equipment

The $50,000 comes from a pharmaceutical company

Unemployment rate drops in northwestern B.C.

Large improvement since Spring 2020

Uplands Nursery this year will do all of the 4600 Block of Lazelle Ave., beginning at its east end, and a portion of the 4700 Block. (File photo)
Lazelle sidewalk project begins June 14

Improvements coming to 4600 and 4700 Blocks

Cassie Hall Elementary School students pose for a picture in their garden. Since 2019, students and staff at the school have been attending to the garden project. (Binny Paul/Terrace Standard)
Cassie Hall students grow a green sanctuary at school

The K-6 elementary school students and staff have been working on the garden project since 2019

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a plenary session at the G7 Summit in Carbis Bay, England on Friday June 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada donating 13M surplus COVID-19 vaccine doses to poor countries

Trudeau says the government will pay for 87 million shots to be distributed to poor countries

Premier John Horgan speaks as provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry, right, and health minister Adrian Dix look on during a press conference to update on the province’s fall pandemic preparedness plan during a press conference from the press theatre at Legislature in Victoria, Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. officials to provide details on Step 2 of COVID reopening plan Monday

Step 2 could allow for larger gatherings and a resumption of recreational travel

Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller is seen during a news conference, Wednesday May 19, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Indigenous child-welfare battle heads to court despite calls for Ottawa to drop cases

Feds are poised to argue against two Canadian Human Rights Tribunal rulings

The Great Ogopogo Bathtub Race has been held in Summerland as a fundraising event. Do you know which Canadian city introduced this sport? (Black Press file photo)
QUIZ: A summer’s day at the water

How much do you know about boats, lakes and water?

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Flowers and cards are left at a makeshift memorial at a monument outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour the 215 children whose remains are believed to have been discovered buried near the city in Kamloops, B.C., on Monday, May 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
‘Pick a Sunday:’ Indigenous leaders ask Catholics to stay home, push for apology

Indigenous leaders are calling on Catholics to stand in solidarity with residential school survivors by not attending church services

Most Read