Signs warning against hitchhiking are in place along Highway 16

Candidates back missing, murdered women inquiry

Issue arose at Terrace, B.C. federal election forum

  • Oct. 14, 2015 10:00 a.m.

A national inquiry into murdered and missing aboriginal women drew support from all candidates at a federal election forum held here Oct. 6.

Liberal candidate Brad Layton said it was also important to act on inquiries and investigations that had already been conducted.

Those inquiries and investigations “should not collect dust on the shelf,” he said.

New Democrat Nathan Cullen re-affirmed an existing pledge of the NDP that it would begin an inquiry within 100 days if elected as the government.

He said he found it interesting that while the Conservative government could find the money for an inquiry into missing salmon on the Fraser River when Prime Minister Stephen Harper “was asked for his opinion on an inquiry [for missing women] he said it’s not on the radar to hold an inquiry.”

That, Cullen continued, showed “a certain level of insensitivity not becoming of the office [of Prime Minister].”

The matter of missing and murdered aboriginal women was one of racism, of poverty and having more choices for young aboriginal women and girls, he added.

“I’ve walked with these families. They have incredible courage year in and year out and we need a government that shares this courage to get to the heart of the matter,” said Cullen.

Conservative candidate Tyler Nesbitt said the issue is “high on his radar.”

“The number of First Nation abused, kidnapped and murdered in this country is absolutely abhorrent,” said Nesbitt.

He said work has already started to implement recommendations from previous inquiries.

“It has to do with family violence and prevention efforts,” Nesbitt said.

“If I’m elected here, I will push for increases in that funding and oppose anyone who wants to take that funding away,” said Nesbitt.

Don Spratt from the Christian Heritage Party and a strong pro-life activist, felt police sometimes have misplaced priorities.

He recounted a time when, while standing outside an abortion clinic in East Vancouver, three police cars circled the block, keeping an eye on him. Their time would have been better spent tracking down serial killers, said Spratt.

 

 

 

 

 

Just Posted

Terrace Adult Hockey League raises $7,300 in memory of Curtis Billey

The money fundraised will be used towards a bursary in his name

City looks for consultant to market Industrial Park

250-acres of undeveloped land is still available, city says

Pacific Northwest Music Festival readies for their 54th year

Many entries this year in speech arts and public speaking

Terrace U14 Ringette team wins gold at BC Provincials

Coach says this season was an unexpected success for the players

Aussies buy majority stake in Red Chris mine

Company looks forward to relationship with Tahltan Nation

VIDEO: Can you believe it? This B.C. hill pulls cars backwards up a slope

Sir Isaac Newton had clearly never been to this Vernon anomaly when he discovered gravity

Canucks hang on for 7-4 win over Senators

Horvat nets 2 for Vancouver

European, Canadian regulators to do own review of Boeing jet

Air Canada plans to remove the Boeing 737 Max from its schedule at least through July 1

Prime minister defends Liberal budget measures as sales effort gets underway

Conservatives under Andrew Scheer say it’s a spree funded by borrowing against the future

Mayor meets with B.C. health minister on homeless taxi transfers

Two homeless people were discharged from Surrey Memorial and sent to a Chilliwack shelter

B.C. lottery winner being sued by co-workers

They claim he owes them $200,000 each, in a lawsuit filed in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver

Teacher reprimanded for conduct towards special needs student

Alan Stephen Berry told vice principal he did not have time to use positive strategies

‘Full worm super moon’ to illuminate B.C. skies on first day of spring

Spring has sprung, a moon named in honour of thawing soil marks final super moon until 2020

Having phone within sight while driving does not violate law: B.C. judge

The mere presence of a cell phone within sight of a driver is not enough for a conviction, judge says

Most Read